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Cheap Talk in the Classroom

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  • Lydia Mechtenberg

Abstract

In this paper, I o¤er a theoretical explanation of the robust gender differences in educational achievement distributions of school children. I consider a one shot cheap talk game with two different types of senders (biased teachers and fair teachers), two types of receivers ("normal" and "special" pupils) and uncertainty about the sender type on the side of the receiver. I demonstrate that the group of pupils who, in expectation, get either too much or too little encouragement will have less top achievers and a lower average achievement than the group of pupils who get a more accurate feedback message, even if the prior talent distribution is the same for both groups of pupils.

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File URL: http://sfb649.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/papers/pdf/SFB649DP2006-019.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany in its series SFB 649 Discussion Papers with number SFB649DP2006-019.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hum:wpaper:sfb649dp2006-019

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Keywords: Cheap talk; Education; Discrimination; Gender;

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References

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  1. Benabou, R. & Laroque, G., 1989. "Using Privileged Information To Manipulate Markets: Insiders, Gurus, And Credibility," Working papers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics 513, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Prendergast, Canice & Topel, Robert H, 1996. "Favoritism in Organizations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 958-78, October.
  3. Sobel, Joel, 1985. "A Theory of Credibility," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 557-73, October.
  4. Stephen Morris, 1999. "Political Correctness," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University 1242, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  5. Lavy, Victor, 2008. "Do gender stereotypes reduce girls' or boys' human capital outcomes? Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 92(10-11), pages 2083-2105, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Ehlers, Tim & Schwager, Robert, 2012. "Honest grading, grade inflation and reputation," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics 143, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  2. Ehlers, Tim & Schwager, Robert, 2012. "Honest grading, grade inflation and reputation," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics 143, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  3. Simon Burgess & Ellen Greaves, 2009. "Test Scores, Subjective Assessment and Stereotyping of Ethnic Minorities," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK 09/221, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  4. Schwager, Robert, 2013. "Majority Vote on Educational Standards," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association 79971, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  5. Ehlers, Tim & Schwager, Robert, 2012. "Honest Grading, Grade Inflation and Reputation," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association 62051, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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