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Economic-Social Interaction in China

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  • Lindbeck, Assar

    ()
    (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

Abstract

This paper analyzes economic-social interaction in China in connection with the country’s change of economic system. I define an economic system in terms of a multidimensional vector of broad institutional characteristics, and I emphasize that important features of the social development are closely related to specific changes in these various dimensions. I classify China’s options for future social improvements into three broad categories: policies that improve the stability and distribution of factor income; government-created wedges between factor income and disposable income; and improvements in the quantity, quality and distribution of human services, such as education and health care.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Research Institute of Industrial Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number 720.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 28 Sep 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:0720

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Keywords: China; Economic transition; Typology of economic systems; Social reforms;

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References

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  1. Assar Lindbeck & Sten Nyberg & Jšrgen W. Weibull, 1999. "Social Norms And Economic Incentives In The Welfare State," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 1-35, February.
  2. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & Ngan Dinh, 2002. "Differential Rewards to, and Contributions of, Education in Urban China’s Segmented Labor Markets," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 508, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  3. Kanbur, Ravi & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2003. "Spatial Inequality in Education and Health Care in China," CEPR Discussion Papers 4136, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Chong-En Bai & Chang-Tai Hsieh & Yingyi Qian, 2006. "The Return to Capital in China," NBER Working Papers 12755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Guang Wan & Enjiang Cheng, 2001. "Effects of land fragmentation and returns to scale in the Chinese farming sector," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 183-194.
  6. Lindbeck, Assar, 1995. "Hazardous Welfare-State Dynamics," Working Paper Series 428, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  7. Hua Wang & Jun Bi & Wheeler, David & Jinnan Wang & Dong Cao & Genfa Lu & Yuan Wang, 2002. "Environmental performance rating and disclosure - China's green-watch program," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2889, The World Bank.
  8. Karen Eggleston & Li Ling & Meng Qingyue & Magnus Lindelow & Adam Wagstaff, 2008. "Health service delivery in China: a literature review," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 149-165.
  9. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 1998. "Geographic Poverty Traps?," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 86, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  10. Whalley, John & Zhang, Shunming, 2007. "A numerical simulation analysis of (Hukou) labour mobility restrictions in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 392-410, July.
  11. Zhang, Xiaobo, 2006. "Asymmetric property rights in China's economic growth:," DSGD discussion papers 28, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  12. Fleisher, Belton M. & Wang, Xiaojun, 2004. "Skill differentials, return to schooling, and market segmentation in a transition economy: the case of Mainland China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 315-328, February.
  13. Jakob Svensson, 2005. "Eight Questions about Corruption," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(3), pages 19-42, Summer.
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Cited by:
  1. Alberto Gabriele, 2010. "The Role of the State in China's Industrial Development: A Reassessment," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(3), pages 325-350, September.
  2. Bonatti, Luigi & Fracasso, Andrea, 2014. "Modeling the Transition Towards Renminbi's Full Convertibility: Implications for China’s Growth," MPRA Paper 54129, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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