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Attitudes Towards Immigration: Does Economic Self-Interest Matter?

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Author Info

  • Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School)

  • Roland Munch, Jakob

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School)

  • Schroll, Sanne

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School)

  • Rose Skaksen, Jan

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School)

Abstract

In this paper, we re-examine the role of economic self-interest in shaping people’s attitudes towards immigration, using data from the European Social Survey 2002/2003. Compared to the existing literature, there are two main contributions of the present paper. First, we develop a more powerful test of the hypothesis that a positive relationship between education and attitudes towards immigration reflects economic self-interest in the labour market. Second, we develop an alternative and more direct test of whether economic self-interest matters for people’s attitudes towards immigration. We find that while the "original" relationship between education and attitudes found in the literature is unlikely to reflect economic self-interest, there is considerable evidence of economic self-interest when using the more direct test.

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File URL: http://openarchive.cbs.dk/cbsweb/handle/10398/7517
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 11-2006.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:cbsnow:2006_011

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Postal: Department of Economics, Copenhagen Business School, Solbjerg Plads 3 C, 5. sal, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
Phone: 38 15 25 75
Fax: 38 15 34 99
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Web page: http://www.cbs.dk/departments/econ/
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References

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  1. Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2004. "Is Immigration Good or Bad for the Economy? Analysis of Attitudinal Responses," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0406, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Facchini, Giovanni & Mayda, Anna Maria, 2006. "Individual Attitudes Towards Immigrants: Welfare-State Determinants Across Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 5702, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. David Card & Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2005. "Understanding attitudes to immigration: The migration and minority module of the first European Social Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0503, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Dustmann, Christian & Preston, Ian, 2000. "Racial and Economic Factors in Attitudes to Immigration," IZA Discussion Papers 190, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2007. "Educated Preferences: Explaining Attitudes Toward Immigration in Europe," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 399-442, April.
  6. Per Krusell & Lee E. Ohanian & Jose-Victor Rios-Rull & Giovanni L. Violante, 1997. "Capital-skill complementarity and inequality: a macroeconomic analysis," Staff Report 239, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  7. Tito Boeri & Herbert Brücker, 2005. "Why are Europeans so tough on migrants?," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 20(44), pages 629-703, October.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. TIIU PAAS & Olga Demidova, 2013. "How people perceive immigrants? role in their country?s life: a comparative study of Estonia and Russia," ERSA conference papers ersa13p569, European Regional Science Association.
  2. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00586821 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. VALENTOVA Marie & ALIEVA Aigul, 2010. "Immigration as a Threat: The Effect of Gender Differences Among Luxembourg Residents with and without a Migration History," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2010-21, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  4. Demidova, Olga, 2012. "The European residents' attitude towards immigrants: A comparative analysis based on the ESS data," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 28(4), pages 23-34.
  5. Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj & Munch, Jakob Roland & Schroll, Sanne & Rose Skaksen, Jan, 2007. "Explaning Cross-Country Differences in Attitudes towards Immigration in the EU-15," Working Papers 05-2007, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics.
  6. Tremewan, James, 2009. "Beliefs about the Economic Impact of Immigration," TSE Working Papers 09-019, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  7. VALENTOVA Marie & BERZOSA Guayarmina, 2010. "Attitudes toward immigrants in Luxembourg - Do contacts matter?," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2010-20, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  8. Chi-Chur Chao & Bharat R. Hazari & Jean-Pierre Laffargue, 2008. "A simple theory of the optimal number of immigrants," PSE Working Papers halshs-00586821, HAL.

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