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Economic Development and Food Demand Changes: Production and Management Implications

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  • Norman Rask

    ()
    (Department of Agricultural Economics, The Ohio State University)

  • Kolleen Rask

    ()
    (Department of Economics, College of the Holy Cross)

Abstract

Per capita food consumption and production changes during economic development are analyzed using a resource-based cereal equivalent measure. Diet up-grades to livestock products during economic development contribute to an increase in per capita food resource use by a factor of five or more. Food consumption changes are generally consistent across countries and are only marginally affected by a country’s food production resource base (land). Food consumption increases tend to exceed food production increases in early stages of development, leading to food import needs. In later stages of development, per capita food consumption stabilizes. Continued increases in production allow the closing of the consumption-production gap for some countries at high income levels. Consumption of pork and poultry meat show the largest percentage increase during economic development; however, beef and dairy products are less efficient in resource use and therefore command a majority of the productive resources for livestock production at all income levels.

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File URL: http://college.holycross.edu/RePEc/hcx/Rask_FoodDevelopment.pdf
File Function: Invited paper presented at the 15th IFMA Congress, “Developing Entrepreneurship Abilities to Feed the World in a Sustainable Way,” Campinas, Brasil, August 14-19, 2005.
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0514.

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Date of creation: Aug 2005
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Handle: RePEc:hcx:wpaper:0514

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Keywords: economic development; food consumption; agricultural self-sufficiency;

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  1. Kolleen Rask & Norman Rask, 2004. "Transition Economies and Globalization: Food System Asymmetries on the Path to Free Markets," Working Papers 0410, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  2. Kolleen Rask & Norman Rask, 2004. "Reaching Turning Points in Economic Transition: Adjustments to Distortions in Resource-based Consumption of Food," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 46(4), pages 542-569, December.
  3. Yotopoulos, Pan A, 1985. "Middle-Income Classes and Food Crises: The "New" Food-Feed Competition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(3), pages 463-83, April.
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