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Estimating some labour market implications of skill biased technology change and imports in Hungary

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  • Hajnalka Tarjani

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    (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Economics)

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    Abstract

    This paper examines the influence of capital accumulation and imports on the relative demand for skilled and unskilled labour in Hungary between 1980 and 2002. Historical data shows that both relative employment and wages of skilled labour were favourably influenced by the changes of the past decades, when the transformation of the Hungarian economy from a centrally planned to a market led regime took place. The paper studies whether these effects were similar to those observed in the international literature in the context of developed and less developed economies. Besides facilitating international comparisons, examination of factor demand functions also aims to complement existing results from the Hungarian literature.

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    File URL: http://econ.core.hu/doc/dp/dp/mtdp0508.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences in its series IEHAS Discussion Papers with number 0508.

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    Length: 26 pages
    Date of creation: 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:0508

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    Keywords: Trade and Labor Market Interactions; Wage Differentials by Skill;

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    1. Aw, Bee Yan & Roberts, Mark J, 1985. "The Role of Imports from the Newly-industrializing Countries in U.S. Production," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 108-17, February.
    2. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-92, June.
    3. Karoly Fazekas, 2003. "Effects of foreign direct investment on the performance of local labour markets - The case of Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0303, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    4. Peter Egger & Robert Stehrer, . "International Outsourcing and the Skill-Specific Wage Bill in Eastern Europe," WIFO Working Papers 151, WIFO.
    5. Ulrich Kohli, 1994. "Canadian Imports and Exports by Origin and Destination: A Semi-flexible Approach," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 580-603, August.
    6. Christis G. Tombazos, 2003. "A Production Theory Approach to the Imports and Wage Inequality Nexus," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(1), pages 42-61, January.
    7. David Card & John E. DiNardo, 2002. "Skill Biased Technological Change and Rising Wage Inequality: Some Problems and Puzzles," NBER Working Papers 8769, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Fallon, P R & Layard, P R G, 1975. "Capital-Skill Complementarity, Income Distribution, and Output Accounting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(2), pages 279-301, April.
    9. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
    10. Arpad Abraham & Gabor Kezdi, 2000. "Long-run trends in earnings and employment in Hungary, 1972-1996," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0002, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    11. Christis Tombazos, 1999. "The role of imports in expanding the demand gap between skilled and unskilled labour in the US," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 509-516.
    12. Zsolt M. Darvas & András Simon, 2000. "Capital Stock and Economic Development in Hungary," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 8(1), pages 197-223, March.
    13. Diewert, Walter E & Wales, Terence J, 1987. "Flexible Functional Forms and Global Curvature Conditions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(1), pages 43-68, January.
    14. Robert Feenstra & Gordon Hanson, 2001. "Global Production Sharing and Rising Inequality: A Survey of Trade and Wages," NBER Working Papers 8372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Haskel, Jonathan E. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2002. "Does the sector bias of skill-biased technical change explain changing skill premia?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1757-1783, December.
    16. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1996. "The Origins of Technology-Skill Complementarity," NBER Working Papers 5657, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Gabor Kertesi & Janos Kollo, 2002. "Labour Demand with Heterogeneous Labour Inputs after the Transition in Hungary, 1992-1999 - and the Potential Consequences of the Increase of Minimum Wage in 2001 and 2002," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0205, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    18. Diewert, W E & Wales, T J, 1988. "Normalized Quadratic Systems of Consumer Demand Functions," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 6(3), pages 303-12, July.
    19. Gabor Kezdi, 2002. "Two Phases of Labor Market Transition in Hungary: Inter-Sectoral Reallocation and Skill-Biased Technological Change," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0203, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    20. Gabor Kertesi & Janos Kollo, 2001. "Economic transformation and the revaluation of human capital - Hungary, 1986-1999," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0104, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
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