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Therapeutic non adherence: a rational behavior revealing patient preferences ?

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Author Info

  • Karine Lamiraud

    (IEMS - Institut d'économie et de management de la santé - Institut d'économie et de management de la santé)

  • Pierre-Yves Geoffard

    (IEMS - Institut d'économie et de management de la santé - Institut d'économie et de management de la santé, PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris, CEPR - Center for Economic Policy Research - CEPR)

Abstract

This paper offers an indirect measure of patient welfare based on whether patients comply with the prescription they receive. Adherence behavior is supposed to reveal patients' subjective valuations of particular therapies. We write a simple theoretical model of patient adherence behavior, that reflects the trade-off between perceived costs and observed regimen efficacy. A discrete choice framework is then used for the estimation, ie the comparison of the incremental benefit of drug intake between two regimens. Consequently, the empirical analysis is based on the identification of patient and drug characteristics associated with adherence. The econometric approach is implemented through a bivariate panel two-equation simultaneous system studying jointly the factors associated with adherence and response to treatment. The data come from a randomized clinical trial conducted in France between 1999 and 2001 and comparing the efficacy of 2 tritherapy strategies in HIV disease. Both the theoretical and empirical results suggest that, for comparable clinical efficacy and toxicity levels, a higher adherence level is associated with higher patient welfare, thus adding valuable information to conclusions drawn by a mere biostatistical analysis. Therefore, from the perspective of the patient, the adherence-enhancing drug must be favored. Our results based on panel data also stress that unobserved patient characteristics account substantially for drug valuation and that the assessment evolves during the course of the treatment. Furthermore, we provide a new framework for the analysis of adherence data. The microeconometric framework highlights that non adherence is an endogenous behavior, thus suggesting new ways for improving adherence.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HAL in its series PSE Working Papers with number halshs-00589121.

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Date of creation: Nov 2006
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Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-00589121

Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00589121
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Related research

Keywords: drug valuation method ; revealed preferences ; endogenous adherence behavior ; panel bivariate probit estimation ; HIV;

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References

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  1. Clarke, Philip M., 1998. "Cost-benefit analysis and mammographic screening: a travel cost approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 767-787, December.
  2. Sickles, Robin C & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "An Analysis of the Health and Retirement Status of the Elderly," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(6), pages 1339-56, November.
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  10. Cleemput, Irina & Kesteloot, Katrien & DeGeest, Sabina, 2002. "A review of the literature on the economics of noncompliance. Room for methodological improvement," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 65-94, January.
  11. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Robert J. Gordon, 1996. "The Economics of New Goods," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bres96-1, May.
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  13. Dyfrig A. Hughes & Adrian Bagust & Alan Haycox & Tom Walley, 2001. "The impact of non-compliance on the cost-effectiveness of pharmaceuticals: a review of the literature," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(7), pages 601-615.
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Cited by:
  1. Mealem, Yosef & Siniver, Erez & Yaniv, Gideon, 2012. "Patient compliance, physician empathy and financial incentives within a principal-agent framework," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 827-830.

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