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Adaption and anticipation effects to life events in the United Kingdom

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  • Luis Angeles

Abstract

We analyze how individual happiness is affected by nine major life events using a panel of British individuals. Our aim is to test the importance of hedonic adaptation in the United Kingdom and to compare our results with equivalent ones obtained in the literature using German data. We also study anticipation effects for each life event. We find evidence that adaptation, although a common phenomenon, is not always complete and in some cases may not even be present. Compared to German individuals, the British appear to adapt much less to marriage and much more to unemployment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow in its series Working Papers with number 2009_08.

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Date of creation: Feb 2009
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Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2009_08

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  1. Luis Angeles, 2008. "Adaption or social comparison? The effects of income on happiness," Working Papers 2009_09, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow, revised Jun 2009.
  2. Andrew E. Clark & Ed Diener & Yannis Georgellis & Richard E. Lucas, 2008. "Lags And Leads in Life Satisfaction: a Test of the Baseline Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(529), pages F222-F243, 06.
  3. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
  4. Andrew E. Clark, 2006. "A Note on Unhappiness and Unemployment Duration," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 52(4), pages 291-308.
  5. Richard E. Lucas & Andrew E. Clark, 2005. "Do people really adapt to marriage?," PSE Working Papers halshs-00590574, HAL.
  6. Di Tella, Rafael & Haisken-De New, John & MacCulloch, Robert, 2010. "Happiness adaptation to income and to status in an individual panel," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 834-852, December.
  7. Stutzer, Alois & Frey, Bruno S., 2006. "Does marriage make people happy, or do happy people get married?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 326-347, April.
  8. Luis Angeles, 2009. "Do children make us happier?," Working Papers 2009_10, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
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Cited by:
  1. Leonardo Becchetti & Alessandra Pelloni, 2010. "What are we learning from the life satisfaction literature?," Econometica Working Papers wp20, Econometica.
  2. Luis Angeles, 2010. "Children and Life Satisfaction," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 523-538, August.
  3. Mikko Myrskylä & Rachel Margolis, 2012. "Happiness: before and after the kids," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  4. Sarah Jewell & Uma Kambhampati, 2012. "The Role of Personality in Adult Life Satisfaction," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2012-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  5. Pedersen, Peder J. & Schmidt, Torben Dall, 2014. "Life Events and Subjective Well-being: The Case of Having Children," IZA Discussion Papers 8207, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Luis Angeles, 2009. "Do children make us happier?," Working Papers 2009_10, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  7. Becchetti, Leonardo & Giachin Ricca, Elena & Pelloni , Alessandra, 2010. "Children, happiness and taxation," AICCON Working Papers 64-2009, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
  8. repec:rdg:wpaper:em-dp2012-02 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. von Scheve, Christian & Esche, Frederike & Schupp, Jürgen, 2013. "The Emotional Timeline of Unemployment: Anticipation, Reaction, and Adaptation," IZA Discussion Papers 7654, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Plagnol, Anke C., 2011. "Financial satisfaction over the life course: The influence of assets and liabilities," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 45-64, February.
  11. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00566855 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00564821 is not listed on IDEAS

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