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An empirical investigation into the determinants and persistence of happiness and life evaluation

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  • Chrostek, Pawel

Abstract

A comparison of measures of happiness and life evaluation indicates significant differences in correlates. Life evaluation is less dependent on external circumstances than happiness. Temporary changes in health, labour market status and income have a smaller impact on life evaluation than on happiness. Despite the differences both types of well-being exhibit a positive relation between current and past well-being. This result contradicts the hypothesis of general habituation.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/50442/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 50442.

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Date of creation: 25 Sep 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50442

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Keywords: hedonic adaptation; subjective well-being; determinants of happiness;

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  1. Rafael Di Tella & John Haisken-De New & Robert MacCulloch, 2007. "Happiness Adaptation to Income and to Status in an Individual Panel," NBER Working Papers 13159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  12. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew J., 2005. "Do Divorcing Couples Become Happier By Breaking Up?," IZA Discussion Papers 1788, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
  14. Bottan, Nicolas Luis & Perez Truglia, Ricardo, 2011. "Deconstructing the hedonic treadmill: Is happiness autoregressive?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 224-236, May.
  15. Bruce Headey & Ruud Muffels & Mark Wooden, 2004. "Money Doesn't Buy Happiness … or Does It? A Reconsideration Based on the Combined Effects of Wealth, Income and Consumption," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2004n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  16. Wang-Sheng Lee & Umut Oguzoglu, 2007. "Are Youths on Income Support Less Happy? Evidence from Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n03, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
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