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Financing Options for Devolved Government in the UK

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  • James Gallagher
  • Daniel Hinze
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    Abstract

    This study provides a comprehensive overview of the financing options for devolved government in the UK. Starting with a discussion of the present situation, the consequences and the possible future of the Barnett formula, the key economic and political principles for devolution finance are examined and then applied to possible financing options. The conclusion draws together the main points of the analysis and comments on the alternatives for funding the devolved administrations. While currently there appears to be considerable cross-party support for the Barnett system, it continues to be a contentious arrangement, with some observers even talking of a “fiscal crisis” (McLean (2005)). The paper therefore reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the present system, together with suggestions for possible changes.

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    File URL: http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_22218_en.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow in its series Working Papers with number 2005_24.

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    Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2005_24

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    1. Isabelle Joumard & Per Mathis Kongsrud, 2003. "Fiscal Relations across Government Levels," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2003(1), pages 155-229.
    2. Iain McLean & Alistair McMillan, 2003. "The Distribution of Public Expenditure across the UK Regions," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 24(1), pages 45-71, March.
    3. Gary Woller & Kerk Phillips, 1998. "Fiscal decentralisation and IDC economic growth: An empirical investigation," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 139-148.
    4. Ulrich Thießen, 2003. "Fiscal Decentralisation and Economic Growth in High-Income OECD Countries," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 24(3), pages 237-274, September.
    5. Ronald MacDonald & Paul Hallwood, 2004. "The Economic Case for Fiscal Federalism in Scotland," Working papers 2004-42, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    6. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Robert McNab, 2001. "Fiscal Decentralization and Economic Growth," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0101, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    7. John Muellbauer, 2005. "Property Taxation and the Economy after the Barker Review," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages C99-C117, 03.
    8. repec:rus:hseeco:124076 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Eric M. Engen & Jonathan Skinner, 1996. "Taxation and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5826, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Laura Blow & John Hall & Stephen Smith, 1996. "Financing regional government in the UK: some issues," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(4), pages 99-120, November.
    11. International Monetary Fund, 2002. "Macroeconomic Management and the Devolution of Fiscal Powers," IMF Working Papers 02/76, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Wallace E. Oates, 1999. "An Essay on Fiscal Federalism," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1120-1149, September.
    13. Julia Darby & Anton Muscatelli & Graeme Roy, 2002. "Fiscal federalism and Fiscal Autonomy: Lessons for the UK from other Industrialised Countries," Working Papers 2002_12, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    14. Arthur Midwinter, 2002. "Territorial Resource Allocation in the UK: A Rejoinder on Needs Assessment," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(5), pages 563-567.
    15. Peter C. Smith, 2003. "Formula Funding of Public Services: An Economic Analysis," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 301-322, Summer.
    16. David King & Matthew Pashley & Rob Ball, 2004. "An English assessment of Scotland’s education spending needs," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 25(4), pages 439-466, December.
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