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A fiscal perspective of state rescaling

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  • Jorge Martinez-Vazquez
  • Andrey Timofeev

Abstract

Recent socio-spatial studies point out a number of ongoing trends in the 'scale division of labour of the state', including among others, 'destatization', 'denationalization' and 'internationalization'. We draw on the literature in public economics to review several approaches to measuring state rescaling. We employ these measures to produce empirical evidence on the extent of state rescaling and its determinants. We find that over the last two decades there has been a world trend towards decentralization while the average government size has not changed. Copyright 2008, Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cjres/rsn027
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge Political Economy Society in its journal Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society.

Volume (Year): 2 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 85-105

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Handle: RePEc:oup:cjrecs:v:2:y:2008:i:1:p:85-105

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  1. Wacziarg, Romain & Alesina, Alberto, 1998. "Openness, Country Size and Government," Scholarly Articles 4553014, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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  12. Akai, Nobuo & Sakata, Masayo, 2002. "Fiscal decentralization contributes to economic growth: evidence from state-level cross-section data for the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 93-108, July.
  13. Axel Dreher, 2006. "Does globalization affect growth? Evidence from a new index of globalization," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(10), pages 1091-1110.
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  17. Panizza, Ugo, 1999. "On the determinants of fiscal centralization: Theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 97-139, October.
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  19. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Robert McNab, 2001. "Fiscal Decentralization and Economic Growth," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0101, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
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Cited by:
  1. Andy Pike & Andr�s Rodr�guez-Pose & John Tomaney & Gianpiero Torrisi & Vassilis Tselios, 2012. "In search of the ‘economic dividend’ of devolution: spatial disparities, spatial economic policy, and decentralisation in the UK," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(1), pages 10-28, February.
  2. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Juan Luis Gómez-Reino, 2011. "An International Perspective on the Determinants of Local Government Fragmentation," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1121, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  3. Alberto Ruiz-Villaverde & Francisco Gónzalez-Gómez, 2011. "The public choice of urban water service management: a multi-criteria approach," Working Papers 1101, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
  4. Gustavo Canavire-Bacarreza & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2012. "Reexamining The Determinants Of Fiscal Decentralization: What Is The Role Of Geography?," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1211, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  5. Torrisi, Gianpiero & Pike, Andy & Tomaney, John & Tselios, Vassilis, 2011. "Defining and measuring decentralisation: a critical review," MPRA Paper 51441, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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