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Property Taxation and the Economy after the Barker Review

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  • John Muellbauer

Abstract

This paper analyses the roles of property and land values in the UK economy and considers property tax reform with the objectives of improving macro-economic stability, resource allocation, economic inequality and the environment. With UK house prices at all-time peaks relative to incomes, concerns about affordability and the distributional consequences have increased. The Barker Review for the UK Treasury of new housing supply reported in 2004 and recommended extensive reforms of the land use planning system, as well as various other reforms, including new development taxes. This paper argues that these taxes are unwise compared to the property tax reforms proposed here. Copyright 2005 Royal Economic Society.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 115 (2005)
Issue (Month): 502 (03)
Pages: C99-C117

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:115:y:2005:i:502:p:c99-c117

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Cited by:
  1. repec:dgr:uvatin:2007058 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. John N. Muellbauer, 2007. "Housing, credit and consumer expenditure," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 267- 334.
  3. Cheshire, Paul & Hilber, Christian A. L., 2007. "Office Space Supply Restrictions in Britain: The Political Economy of Market Revenge," MPRA Paper 5435, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. John Muellbauer, 2012. "When is a housing market overheated enough to threaten stability?," Economics Series Working Papers 623, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Campbell Leith & Simon Wren-lewis, 2006. "Fiscal Stabilisation Policy and Fiscal Institutions," WEF Working Papers 0007, ESRC World Economy and Finance Research Programme, Birkbeck, University of London.
  6. James Gallagher & Daniel Hinze, . "Financing Options for Devolved Government in the UK," Working Papers 2005_24, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  7. Wouter Vermeulen & Jan Rouwendal, 2007. "Housing supply in the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 87, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  8. Paul Cheshire, 2009. "Urban land markets and policy failures," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30837, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  9. Wouter Vermeulen & Jan Rouwendal, 2007. "Housing Supply and Land Use Regulation in the Netherlands," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-058/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  10. David Clapham, 2006. "Housing Policy and the Discourse of Globalization," European Journal of Housing Policy, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 55-76, April.

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