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Human capital, household welfare, and children's schooling in Mozambique:

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  • Handa, Sudhanshu
  • Simler, Kenneth R.
  • Harrower, Sarah

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series Research reports with number 134.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:resrep:134

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Keywords: Human capital; households; Education; School children;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

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  1. Hanushek, Eric A, 1995. "Interpreting Recent Research on Schooling in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 227-46, August.
  2. Tansel, Aysit, 1997. "Schooling Attainment, Parental Education, and Gender in Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(4), pages 825-56, July.
  3. Lavy, Victor, 1996. "School supply constraints and children's educational outcomes in rural Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 291-314, December.
  4. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
  5. Tan, Jee-Peng & Lane, Julia & Coustere, Paul, 1997. "Putting Inputs to Work in Elementary Schools: What Can Be Done in the Philippines?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(4), pages 857-79, July.
  6. Gomes-Neto, Joao Batista & Hanushek, Eric A, 1994. "Causes and Consequences of Grade Repetition: Evidence from Brazil," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 117-48, October.
  7. Kremer, Michael R, 1995. "Research on Schooling: What We Know and What We Don't: A Comment," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 247-54, August.
  8. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  9. Duncan Thomas & John Strauss & Maria-Helena Henriques, 1991. "How Does Mother's Education Affect Child Height?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 183-211.
  10. Schultz, T. Paul, 1988. "Education investments and returns," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 543-630 Elsevier.
  11. Halvorsen, Robert & Palmquist, Raymond, 1980. "The Interpretation of Dummy Variables in Semilogarithmic Equations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 474-75, June.
  12. Glick, Peter & Sahn, David E, 1997. "Gender and Education Impacts on Employment and Earnings in West Africa: Evidence from Guinea," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(4), pages 793-823, July.
  13. Strauss, J. & Thomas, D., 1995. "Empirical Modeling of Household and Family Decisions," Papers, RAND - Reprint Series 95-12, RAND - Reprint Series.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. World Bank, 2008. "Mozambique - Beating the Odds : Sustaining Inclusion in a Growing Economy - A Mozambique Poverty, Gender, and Social Assessment, Volume 1. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7981, The World Bank.
  2. Heltberg, Rasmus & Simler, Kenneth & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Public Spending and Poverty in Mozambique," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  3. Kristjanson, Patricia & Radeny, Maren & Baltenweck, Isabelle & Ogutu, Joseph & Notenbaert, An, 2005. "Livelihood mapping and poverty correlates at a meso-level in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 568-583.
  4. Mather, David, 2011. "Working-Age Adult Mortality, Orphan Status, and Child Schooling in Rural Mozambique," Food Security International Development Working Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 119320, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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