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Job-to-job flows and the consequences of job separations

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Author Info

  • Bruce Fallick
  • John Haltiwanger
  • Erika McEntarfer

Abstract

This paper extends the literature on the earnings losses of displaced workers to provide a more comprehensive picture of the earnings and employment outcomes for workers who separate. First, we compare workers who separate from distressed employers (presumably displaced workers) and those who separate from stable or growing employers. Second, we distinguish between workers who do and do not experience a spell of joblessness. Third, we examine the full distribution of earnings outcomes from separations - not the impact on only the average worker. We find that earnings outcomes depend much less on whether a job separation is associated with a distressed employer than on whether the separator experienced a jobless spell after the separation. Moreover, we find that workers separating from distressed firms are faster to find jobs at new employers than are other separators.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series Finance and Economics Discussion Series with number 2012-73.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2012-73

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References

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  1. Bruce Fallick & Keunkwan Ryu, 2007. "The Recall and New Job Search of Laid-Off Workers: A Bivariate Proportional Hazard Model with Unobserved Heterogeneity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 313-323, May.
  2. Robert H. Topel & Michael P. Ward, 1988. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," NBER Working Papers 2649, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Melissa Bjelland & Bruce Fallick & John Haltiwanger & Erika McEntarfer, 2007. "Employer-to-employer flows in the United States: estimates using linked employer-employee data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-30, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Davis, Steven J. & Faberman, R. Jason & Haltiwanger, John, 2012. "Labor market flows in the cross section and over time," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 1-18.
  5. Anabela Carneiro & Pedro Portugal, 2006. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers: Evidence from a Matched Employer-Employee Data Set," Working Papers w200614, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  6. Alexander Hijzen & Richard Upward & Peter W. Wright, 2010. "The Income Losses of Displaced Workers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(1).
  7. AMOS GOLAN & JULIA LANE & ERIKA McENTARFER, 2007. "The Dynamics of Worker Reallocation within and across Industries," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(293), pages 1-20, 02.
  8. Kevin McKinney & Lars Vilhuber, 2006. "Using linked employer-employee data to investigate the speed of adjustments in downsizing firms," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2006-03, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  9. Paul A. Lengermann & Lars Vilhuber, 2002. "Abandoning the Sinking Ship: The Composition of Worker Flows Prior to Displacement," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2002-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  10. Robert F. Schoeni & Michael Dardia, 1997. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers in the 1990s," JCPR Working Papers 8, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  11. Bruce Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2004. "Employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market: the complete picture of gross worker flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-34, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dube, Arindrajit & Lester, T. William & Reich, Michael, 2013. "Minimum Wage Shocks, Employment Flows and Labor Market Frictions," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt27z0006g, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  2. Toshihiko Mukoyama, 2013. "The cyclicality of job-to-job transitions and its implications for aggregate productivity," International Finance Discussion Papers 1074, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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