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A Cultural Clash View of the EU Crisis

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  • Luigi Guiso

    (EIEF and CEPR)

  • Helios Herrera

    (HEC Montréal)

  • Massimo Morelli

    (Columbia University)

Abstract

If voters of different countries adhere to different and deeply rooted cultural norms, when these countries interact their leaders may find it impossible to agree on efficient policies especially in hard times. Political leaders' actions are bound by a "conformity constraint" that requires them to express policies that do not violate these norms. This inhibits politicians from adopting the optimal policies as they may clash with either one or the other of the cultures of the interacting countries. We model this mechanism and argue that conformity constraints and cultural clash can help us understand the poor management of the Greek crisis and the resulting European Sovereign debt crisis. We show the conditions under which the introduction in Europe of a fiscal union can be obtained with consensus and be beneficial.Perhaps counter-intuitively, cultural diversity makes a fiscal union even more desirable.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF) in its series EIEF Working Papers Series with number 1321.

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Length: 48 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision: Jul 2013
Handle: RePEc:eie:wpaper:1321

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