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The Impact of Structured Training on Workers’ Employability and Productivity

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Author Info

  • Ang Boon Heng

    (Ministry of Manpower, Singapore, NUS)

  • Park Cheolsung
  • Liu Haoming
  • Shandre M. Thangavelu
  • James Wong

Abstract

The study, which examines the impact of training on the Singapore labour market, focuses on two main hypotheses. First, does structured training actually benefit those who have undergone training? Second, what factors affect workers' participation in structured training programs? The paper also provides policy discussions on the government policies that actively encourage workers to go for training. Finally, the paper discusses some policy implications for the Singapore economy.

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File URL: http://saber.eaber.org/node/21918
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by East Asian Bureau of Economic Research in its series Labor Economics Working Papers with number 21918.

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Date of creation: Dec 2006
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Handle: RePEc:eab:laborw:21918

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Postal: JG Crawford Building #13, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, Australian National University, ACT 0200
Web page: http://www.eaber.org
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  1. Budría, Santiago & Pereira, Pedro T., 2004. "On the Returns to Training in Portugal," IZA Discussion Papers 1429, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2006. "Are there Asymmetries in the Effects of Training on the Conditional Male Wage Distribution?," CEPR Discussion Papers 523, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Bartel, Ann P, 1995. "Training, Wage Growth, and Job Performance: Evidence from a Company Database," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 401-25, July.
  4. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-22, February.
  5. David H. Greenberg & Charles Michalopoulos & Philip K. Robins, 2003. "A meta-analysis of government-sponsored training programs," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(1), pages 31-53, October.
  6. Ann P. Bartel, 1992. "Training, Wage Growth and Job Performance: Evidence From a Company Database," NBER Working Papers 4027, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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