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Can child care policy encourage employment and fertility? Evidence from a structural model

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Author Info

  • Peter Haan

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Katharina Wrohlich

Abstract

In this paper we develop a structural model of female employment and fertility which accounts for intertemporal feedback effects between the two outcomes. We identify the effect of financial incentives on the employment and fertility decision by exploiting variation in the tax and transfer system which differs by employment state and number of children. To this end we simulate in detail the effects of the tax and transfer system including child care costs. The model provides estimates of structural preferences of women which can be used to study the effect of various policy reforms. In particular, we show that increasing child care subsidies conditional on employment increases labor supply of all women as well as fertility of the childless and highly educated women.

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File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2009-025.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2009-025.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2009-025

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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Keywords: employment; fertility;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Helmut Mahringer & Christine Zulehner, 2012. "Child-Care Costs and Mothers' Employment Rates. An Empirical Analysis for Austria," WIFO Working Papers 429, WIFO.
  2. Anna Lovasz & Agnes Szabo-Morvai, 2013. "Does Childcare Matter for Maternal Labor Supply? Pushing the limits of the Regression Discontinuity Framework," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1313, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  3. Anna Kurowska & Michal Myck & Katharina Wrohlich, 2012. "Family and Labor Market Choices: Requirements to Guide Effective Evidence-Based Policy," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1234, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. repec:diw:diwwpp:dp1315 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. C. Katharina Spieß, 2011. "Vereinbarkeit von Familie und Beruf – wie wirksam sind deutsche „Care Policies“?," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(s1), pages 4-27, 05.
  6. Johannes Geyer & Peter Haan & Katharina Wrohlich, 2014. "The Effects of Family Policy on Mothers' Labor Supply: Combining Evidence from a Structural Model and a Natural Experiment," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1366, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  7. Bick, Alexander, 2010. "The quantitative role of child care for female labor force participation and fertility," MPRA Paper 25474, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Alexander Bick, 2010. "The Quantitative Role of Child Care for Fertility and Female Labor Force Participation," 2010 Meeting Papers 892, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. Verena Tobsch, 2013. "Betreuung von Schulkindern: ein weiterer Schlüssel zur Aktivierung ungenutzter Arbeitskräftepotenziale?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 573, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  10. REINSTADLER Anne, 2011. "Luxembourg and France: Comparable Family Benefits, Comparable Fertility Levels?," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2011-65, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  11. Pia S. Schober & Christian Schmitt, 2013. "Day-Care Expansion and Parental Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 602, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  12. Rainald Borck, 2011. "Adieu Rabenmutter - The Effect of Culture on Fertility, Female Labour Supply, the Gender Wage Gap and Childcare," CESifo Working Paper Series 3337, CESifo Group Munich.
  13. Mizuochi, Masaaki, 2012. "The Effect of Work-family Balance Policy on Childbirth and Women's Work," Discussion Paper Series 575, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  14. Vanleenhove, Pieter, 2013. "Full Childcare Coverage: Higher Maternal Labour Supply and Childcare Usage?," EUROMOD Working Papers em19/13, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  15. Myck, Michal & Kurowska, Anna & Kundera, Michał, 2013. "Financial Support for Families with Children and its Trade-offs: Balancing Redistribution and Parental Work Incentives," IZA Discussion Papers 7506, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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