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Did Expanding the EITC Promote Motherhood?

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  • Reagan Baughman
  • Stacy Dickert-Conlin
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/000282803321947137
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 93 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 247-251

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:93:y:2003:i:2:p:247-251

    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282803321947137
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    1. Jeff Grogger & Stephen G. Bronars, 1997. "The Effect of Welfare Payments on the Marriage and Fertility Behavior of Unwed Mothers: Results from a Twins Experiment," NBER Working Papers 6047, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Whittington, Leslie A & Alm, James & Peters, H Elizabeth, 1990. "Fertility and the Personal Exemption: Implicit Pronatalist Policy in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 545-56, June.
    3. Hotz, V-J & Kerman, J-A & Willis, R-J, 1996. "The Economics of Fertility in Developed Countries : A Survey," Papers 96-09, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
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    Cited by:
    1. Michael Lovenheim & Kevin Mumford, 2010. "Do Family Wealth Shocks Affect Fertility Choices? Evidence from the Housing Market Boom and Bust," Discussion Papers 09-004, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    2. Haan, Peter & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2011. "Can child care policy encourage employment and fertility?: Evidence from a structural model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 498-512, August.
    3. Thomas DeLeire & Leonard M. Lopoo & Kosali I. Simon, 2007. "Medicaid Expansions and Fertility in the United States," NBER Working Papers 12907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dan Anderberg, 2007. "Tax Credits, Income Support and Partnership Decisions," CESifo Working Paper Series 2147, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Azmat, Ghazala & Gonzalez, Libertad, 2009. "Targeting Fertility and Female Participation Through the Income Tax," IZA Discussion Papers 4405, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Ohinata, Asako, 2008. "Fertility Response to Financial Incentives-Evidence from the Working Families Tax Credit in the UK," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 851, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    7. Helmut Rainer & Stefan Bauernschuster & Natalia Danzer & Anita Fichtl & Timo Hener & Christian Holzner & Janina Reinkowski, 2013. "Kindergeld und Kinderfreibeträge in Deutschland: Evaluierung der Auswirkungen auf familienpolitische Ziele," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(09), pages 28-36, 04.
    8. Mike Brewer & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2008. "Does welfare reform affect fertility? Evidence from the UK," IFS Working Papers W08/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Daniel Chen, 2011. "Can countries reverse fertility decline? Evidence from France’s marriage and baby bonuses, 1929–1981," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 253-272, June.
    10. Andrew Leigh, 2005. "Who Benefits from the Earned Income Tax Credit? Incidence Among Recipients, Coworkers and Firms," CEPR Discussion Papers 494, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    11. Olugbenga Ajilore, 2008. "The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Poverty: Analyzing the Dimensions by Race and Immigration," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 117-127, December.

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