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Distance Friction and the Cost of Hunting in Tropical Forests

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  • Anders H. Siren

    ()

  • Juan-Camilo Cardenas

    ()

  • Peter Hamback

    ()

  • Kalle Parvinen

    ()

Abstract

Empirical studies of tropical forest hunting have shown the existence of marked spatialgradients of hunting effort, game harvest, and animal abundance, as hunters mostlyhunt near villages, roads, and rivers. The mechanisms underlying these patterns have,however, hitherto been poorly known. This article presents a spatial bioeconomicmodel based on the concept of distance friction, i.e. an increasing marginal cost ofdistance. The model is validated by comparison with an economic field experimentwith Amazonian hunters and with previous empirical data on hunting.

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File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2012-37.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE in its series DOCUMENTOS CEDE with number 010317.

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Length: 28
Date of creation: 29 Oct 2012
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Handle: RePEc:col:000089:010317

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Keywords: Hunting; hunting costs; distance friction; field experiments; Amazon;

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  1. Elizabeth J. Z. Robinson & Jeffrey C. Williams & Heidi J. Albers, 2002. "The Influence of Markets and Policy on Spatial Patterns of Non-Timber Forest Product Extraction," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(2), pages 260-271.
  2. Elizabeth J. Z. Robinson & Heidi J. Albers & Jeffrey C. Williams, 2006. "Spatial and Temporal Modeling of Community Non-Timber Forest Extraction," CSAE Working Paper Series 2006-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Juan Camilo Cardenas & Jeffrey Carpenter, 2008. "Behavioural Development Economics: Lessons from Field Labs in the Developing World," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 311-338.
  4. Albers, H.J., 2010. "Spatial modeling of extraction and enforcement in developing country protected areas," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 165-179, April.
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