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Return migration of foreign students andthe choice of non-resident tuition fees

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  • Thomas Lange

Abstract

The paper presents a model of student migration in order to determine the optimal choice of non-resident tuition fees in a host country of higher education. Students with rational expectations consider a potential return migration in their first-round decision whether to study abroad, so that demand for the higher education system in the host country and optimal non-resident tuition fees depend on the stay rates of foreign-born graduates.A decline in stay rates of foreign students is demonstrated to induce a cutback of tuition fees if the costs of education per student are not too high. The fact that students take into account the possibility of return migration after graduation in their first-stage location decision in combination with rational expectations finally drives this result.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-Ifo_Working_Papers/wp-ifo-2005-2010/IfoWorkingPaper-74.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its series Ifo Working Paper Series with number Ifo Working Paper No. 74.

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Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_74

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Related research

Keywords: tuition fees; oversea students; return migration; rational expectations; brain drain; preference for foreign lifestyle;

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References

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  1. Frederic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2007. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0710, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. William Carrington & Enrica Detragiache, 1998. "How Big is the Brain Drain?," IMF Working Papers 98/102, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A Brain Gain with a Brain Drain," Economics Series 45, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  4. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino & Giovanni Peri, 2004. "How Large Is the "Brain Drain" from Italy?," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 63(1), pages 1-32, April.
  5. Jonathan Chaloff & Georges Lemaître, 2009. "Managing Highly-Skilled Labour Migration: A Comparative Analysis of Migration Policies and Challenges in OECD Countries," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 79, OECD Publishing.
  6. Stark, Oded, 2003. "Rethinking The Brain Drain," Discussion Papers 18770, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
  7. Miriam Henseler & Joachim Plesch, 2009. "How Can Scholarship Institutions Foster the Return of Foreign Students?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 229(4), pages 382-409, August.
  8. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10449, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  9. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Dellalfar, William, 1973. "The brain drain and income taxation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 1(1-2), pages 94-101, February.
  10. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Hamada, Koichi, 1974. "The brain drain, international integration of markets for professionals and unemployment : A theoretical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-42, April.
  11. Baruch, Yehuda & Budhwar, Pawan S. & Khatri, Naresh, 2007. "Brain drain: Inclination to stay abroad after studies," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 99-112, March.
  12. Dustmann, Christian, 2003. "Return migration, wage differentials, and the optimal migration duration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 353-369, April.
  13. Straubhaar, Thomas, 2000. "International mobility of the highly skilled: Brain gain, brain drain or brain exchange," HWWA Discussion Papers 88, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  14. Christian Dustmann & Yoram Weiss, 2007. "Return Migration: Theory and Empirical Evidence from the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 236-256, 06.
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Cited by:
  1. Thomas Lange, 2013. "Return migration of foreign students and non-resident tuition fees," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 703-718, April.

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