Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

International mobility of the highly skilled: Brain gain, brain drain or brain exchange

Contents:

Author Info

  • Straubhaar, Thomas

Abstract

The aim of this paper was to shift the focus from a negative prejudice about immigration towards a much more positive evaluation. More and more the migration pattern changes from a blue-collar migration of low qualified workers towards a whitecollar mobility of highly skilled professionals. It has to be stressed strongly that - strikingly enough - most migrants are relatively well qualified. Just to mention a new IMF study (Carrington/Detragiache 1999:47), the US data show that immigration flows of individuals with no more than a primary education are quite small, and reach only about 500?000 individuals out of a total of 7 million immigrants! ?For most countries, people with a tertiary education have the highest migration rate ... Thus, migrant to the Unites States tend to be better educated than the average person in their home (that is the sending) country, and the proportion of very highly educated people who migrate is particularly high? (Carrington/Detragiache 1999:48). So, these data clearly indicate that there is a substantial brain drain. Another question of quite similar importance is, why the US only should get a brain gain. Why not the EU? The immigration of highly skilled is crucial and decisive for growth and wealth of nations in the 21st century. Once again this is clearly seen and strategically developed in the US. The USA attracts highly skilled people from all over the world because of a number of natural as well as artificial benefits (?sun, sea, and sand?, close relations between industry and universities etc.) and, therefore, experiences a ?Brain Gain? that stimulates growth. In the case of Europe, mobility is mainly intra-European, representing a ?Brain Exchange?. This is being fuelled by the Europeanisation of production and the creation of an internal labour market. However, the EU lacks the magnetic power to attract high skilled foreign scientists and to become leading centres of research intensive (service) production. For Eastern Europe there is a fear of a ?Brain Drain? that will not be directed towards the EU but rather towards the US. --

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/19463/1/88.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA) in its series HWWA Discussion Papers with number 88.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwadp:26296

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, D-20347 Hamburg
Phone: 0049-40-42834-0
Fax: 0049-40-42834-451
Email:
Web page: http://www.econstor.eu/handle/10419/20
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
  2. J. N. Bhagwati & C. Rodriguez, 1975. "Welfare-Theoretical Analysis of the Brain Drain," Working papers, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics 158, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  3. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  4. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  5. Romer, Paul M, 1987. "Growth Based on Increasing Returns Due to Specialization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 56-62, May.
  6. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Dellalfar, William, 1973. "The brain drain and income taxation," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 1(1-2), pages 94-101, February.
  7. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
  8. Jaffe, Adam B, 1989. "Real Effects of Academic Research," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 957-70, December.
  9. Berry, R Albert & Soligo, Ronald, 1969. "Some Welfare Aspects of International Migration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 778-94, Sept./Oct.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Peter Schaeffer, 2005. "Human capital, migration strategy, and brain drain," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 319-335.
  2. Bildirici, M. & Orcan, M. & Sunal, S. & Aykaç, E., 2005. "Determinants of Human Capital Theory, Growth and Brain Drain: An Econometric Analysis for 77 Countries," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(2).
  3. Michael Knogler & Volkhart Vincentz, 2004. "EU-Erweiterung : Die wirtschaftliche Beitrittsfähigkeit der Balkanländer," Working Papers, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies) 249, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
  4. Wink, Ruediger, 2002. "The transregional dimension of territorial knowledge management. An evolutionary perspective on the role of universities," ERSA conference papers ersa02p496, European Regional Science Association.
  5. P. Giannoccolo, 2003. "Brain Drain and Fiscal Competition. A theoretical model for the Europe," Working Papers 481, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  6. Boncea Irina, 2013. "Medical Brain Drain - A Theoretical Approach," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 64-71, July.
  7. D'Costa, Anthony P., 2006. "The International Mobility of Technical Talent: Trends and Development Implications," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) RP2006/143, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  8. Thomas Lange, 2009. "Return migration of foreign students andthe choice of non-resident tuition fees," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Paper No. 74, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  9. Searing, Elizabeth A.M. & Rios-Avila, Fernando & Lecy, Jesse D., 2013. "The impact of psychological trauma on wages in post-conflict Bosnia and Herzegovina," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 165-173.
  10. Jan Kranich, 2008. "R&D and the agglomeration of industries," Working Paper Series in Economics, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics 83, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  11. Anthony P. D'Costa, 2006. "The International Mobility of Technical Talent: Trends and Development Implications," Working Papers id:778, eSocialSciences.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwadp:26296. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.