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Education and Italian Regional Development

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  • Adriana Di Liberto
  • James Symons

Abstract

Given recent emphasis on externality to education, macroeconomic studies have a role to play in the analysis of return to schooling. In this paper we study the connection between growth and human capital in a convergence regression for the panel of Italian regions. We include measures of average, primary, secondary and tertiary education. We find that increased education seems to contribute to growth only in the South. Decomposing total schooling into its three constituent parts, we find that only primary education in the South seems to be important. The results thus suggest that the Italian growth benefited from the elimination of illiteracy in the South, mainly in the 1960s, but not from the substantial increases in education at the other levels.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0496.

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Date of creation: Jun 2001
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0496

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Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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Keywords: Returns to education; regional Italian growth;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Simona Iammarino & Elisabetta Marinelli, 2012. "Education-Job (Mis)Matching And Interregional Migration: Italian University Graduates’ Transition To Work," Working Papers 8, Birkbeck Centre for Innovation Management Research, revised Sep 2012.
  2. Herbst, Mikolaj & Rok, Jakub, 2013. "Mobility of human capital and its effect on regional economic development. Review of theory and empirical literature," MPRA Paper 45755, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Rosa Bernadini Papalia & Silvia Bertarelli, 2013. "Identification and Estimation of Club Convergence Models with Spatial Dependence," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(6), pages 2094-2115, November.
  4. Enrique López-Bazo & Burhan Can Karahasan, 2011. "The Spatial Distribution of Human Capital: Can It Really Be Explained by Regional Differences in Market Access?," IREA Working Papers 201102, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Feb 2011.
  5. M. Deidda & A. Di Liberto & M. Foddi & G. Sulis, 2012. "Employment Subsidies, Informal Economy and Women’s Transition into Work in a Depressed Area: Evidence from a Matching Approach," Working Paper CRENoS 201216, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  6. Emanuela Marrocu & Raffaele Paci, 2011. "Education or just Creativity: what matters most for economic performance?," ERSA conference papers ersa11p199, European Regional Science Association.
  7. S. Lodde, 2007. "Human Capital And Productivity Growth In The Italian Regional Economies: A Sectoral Analysis," Working Paper CRENoS 200711, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  8. Leone Leonida, . "On the Effects of Industrialization Processes on Growth and Convergence Dynamics: Evidence from Italian Regions," Discussion Papers 04/15, Department of Economics, University of York.
  9. Manca, Fabio, 2011. "Education, Catch-up and Growth in Spain," Investigaciones Regionales, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 20, pages 5-28.
  10. Benos, Nikos & Karagiannis, Stelios, 2013. "Do Cross-Section Dependence and Parameter Heterogeneity Matter? Evidence on Human Capital and Productivity in Greece," MPRA Paper 53326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Herbst, Mikolaj & Wójcik, Piotr, 2011. "Growth and divergence of the polish subregions over 1995–2006: a search for determinants and spatial patterns," MPRA Paper 34731, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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