Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Economics of Green Building

Contents:

Author Info

  • Eichholtz, Piet
  • Kok, Nils
  • Quigley, John M.

Abstract

Research on climate change suggests that small improvements in the "sustainability" of buildings can have large effects on greenhouse gas emissions and on energy efficiency in the economy. This paper analyzes the economics of "green" building. First, we analyze a panel of office buildings "certified" by independent rating agencies, finding that large recent increases in the supply of green buildings and the unprecedented volatility in property markets have not significantly affected the relative returns to green buildings. Second, we analyze a large cross section of office buildings, demonstrating that economic premiums in rent and asset values are substantial. Third, we relate the economic premiums for green buildings to their sustainability, confirming that the attributes rated for both thermal efficiency and sustainability contribute to premiums in rents and asset values. Even among green buildings, increased energy efficiency is fully capitalized into rents and asset values.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/3k16p2rj.pdf;origin=repeccitec
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy in its series Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series with number qt3k16p2rj.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 15 Sep 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cdl:bphupl:qt3k16p2rj

Contact details of provider:
Postal: F502 Haas, Berkeley CA 94720-1922
Phone: (510) 642-1922
Fax: (510) 642-5018
Email:
Web page: http://www.escholarship.org/repec/iber_bphup/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Social and Behavioral Sciences;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Glaeser, Edward L. & Kahn, Matthew E., 2010. "The greenness of cities: Carbon dioxide emissions and urban development," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 404-418, May.
  2. Eichholtz, Piet & Kok, Nils & Quigley, John M., 2009. "Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt507394s4, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
  3. Nicholas Stern, 2008. "The Economics of Climate Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 1-37, May.
  4. Siqi Zheng & Rui Wang & Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2011. "The greenness of China: household carbon dioxide emissions and urban development," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(5), pages 761-792, September.
  5. Matthew J. Kotchen, 2006. "Green Markets and Private Provision of Public Goods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(4), pages 816-845, August.
  6. Black, Dan A. & Smith, J.A.Jeffrey A., 2004. "How robust is the evidence on the effects of college quality? Evidence from matching," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 99-124.
  7. Matthew E. Kahn, 2009. "Urban Growth and Climate Change," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 333-350, 09.
  8. Franz Fuerst & Patrick McAllister, 2011. "Green Noise or Green Value? Measuring the Effects of Environmental Certification on Office Values," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 45-69, 03.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Matthew E. Kahn & Nils Kok, 2014. "Big-Box Retailers and Urban Carbon Emissions: The Case of Wal-Mart," NBER Working Papers 19912, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Timothy Simcoe & Michael W. Toffel, 2012. "Government Green Procurement Spillovers: Evidence from Municipal Building Policies in California," Harvard Business School Working Papers 13-030, Harvard Business School, revised May 2014.
  3. Dieckhoener, Caroline, 2012. "Does subsidizing investments in energy efficiency reduce energy consumption? Evidence from Germany," EWI Working Papers 2012-17, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln.
  4. Brounen, Dirk & Kok, Nils & Quigley, John M., 2013. "Energy literacy, awareness, and conservation behavior of residential households," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 42-50.
  5. Tessa Hebb & Ashley Hamilton & Heather Hachigian, 2010. "Responsible Property Investing in Canada: Factoring Both Environmental and Social Impacts in the Canadian Real Estate Market," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 92(1), pages 99-115, April.
  6. Piet Eichholtz & Nils Kok & John M. Quigley, 2010. "Doing Well by Doing Good? Green Office Buildings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2492-2509, December.
  7. Konstantin A. Kholodilin & Claus Michelsen, 2014. "The Market Value of Energy Efficiency in Buildings and the Mode of Tenure," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1398, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  8. Nils Kok & Marquise McGraw & John Quigley, 2012. "The diffusion over time and space of energy efficiency in building," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 541-564, April.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdl:bphupl:qt3k16p2rj. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lisa Schiff).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.