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Urban Growth and Climate Change

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  • Matthew E. Kahn

    ()
    (Institute of the Environment and Department of Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095; NBER, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138)

Abstract

Between 1950 and 2030, the share of the world's population that lives in cities is predicted to grow from 30% to 60%. This urbanization has consequences for the likelihood of climate change and for the social costs that climate change will impose on the world's quality of life. This paper examines how urbanization affects greenhouse gas production, and it studies how urbanites in the developed and developing world will adapt to the challenges posed by climate change.

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File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.resource.050708.144249
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Annual Reviews in its journal Annual Review of Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 1 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (09)
Pages: 333-350

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Handle: RePEc:anr:reseco:v:1:y:2009:p:333-350

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Related research

Keywords: global externality; tragedy of the commons; adaptation; incidence; cities; global warming;

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Al Gore Changes His Mind on the Beneficial Role of Climate Change Adaptation
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2013-02-10 16:30:00
  2. Al Gore’s Nuanced Support for Climate Change Adaptation Efforts
    by Matthew E. Kahn in The Reality-Based Community on 2013-02-10 16:36:53
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Devin Bunten & Matthew E. Kahn, 2014. "The Impact of Emerging Climate Risks on Urban Real Estate Price Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 20018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Sinha, Paramita & Cropper, Maureen L., 2013. "The Value of Climate Amenities: Evidence from US Migration Decisions," Discussion Papers dp-13-01, Resources For the Future.
  3. Piet Eichholtz & Nils Kok & John M. Quigley, 2013. "The Economics of Green Building," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 50-63, March.
  4. Albouy, David & Graf, Walter & Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2013. "Climate Amenities, Climate Change, and American Quality of Life," IZA Discussion Papers 7339, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. David Albouy & Walter Graf & Ryan Kellogg & Hendrik Wolff, 2010. "Aversion to Extreme Temperatures, Climate Change, and Quality of Life," Working Papers UWEC-2011-03, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  6. Kousky, Carolyn, 2012. "Informing Climate Adaptation: A Review of the Economic Costs of Natural Disasters, Their Determinants, and Risk Reduction Options," Discussion Papers dp-12-28, Resources For the Future.

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