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Firm-Level Productivity and Technical Efficiency in MENA Manufacturing Industry: The Role of the Investment Climate

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Author Info

  • Tidiane KINDA

    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

  • Patrick PLANE

    ()
    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

  • Marie-Ange VEGANZONES-VAROUDAKIS

    ()
    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between firm-level productivity and investment climate (IC) for a large number of countries (23) and manufacturing industries (8). We first propose three measures of firms’ productive performances: Labor Productivity (LP), Total Factor Productivity (TFP), and Technical Efficiency (TE). We reveal that enterprises in MENA perform in average poorly, compared to other countries of the sample. The exception is Morocco, whose various measures of firm-level productivity rank close to the ones of the most productive countries. We show at the same time that firms’ competitiveness in MENA is handicapped by high Unit Labor Cost, compared to main competitors like China and India. The empirical analysis also reveals that the investment climate matters for firms productive performances. This is true (depending on the industry) for the quality of a large set of infrastructures, the experience and level of education of the labor force, the cost and access to financing, as well as to a lower extent, different dimensions of the government-business relation. These findings bear important policy implication by showing which dimension of the investment climate could help manufacturing firms in MENA to be more competitive on the world market.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CERDI in its series Working Papers with number 200819.

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Length: 36
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in , 2011, pages
Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:1016

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  1. John McMillan, 1998. "Managing Economic Change: Lessons from New Zealand," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(6), pages 827-843, 08.
  2. Dollar, David & Hallward-Driemeier, Mary & Mengistae, Taye, 2005. "Investment Climate and Firm Performance in Developing Economies," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 1-31, October.
  3. Escribano, Alvaro & Guasch, J. Luis, 2005. "Assessing the impact of the investment climate on productivity using firm-level data : methodology and the cases of Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3621, The World Bank.
  4. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 1999. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Kathy S. He & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung, 2003. "Corporate Stability and Economic Growth," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 553, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, 06.
  7. John McMillan, 2004. "A Flexible Economy? Entrepreneurship and Productivity in New Zealand," Discussion Papers 03-032, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
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Cited by:
  1. Ayadi, Rym & De Groen, Willem Pieter, 2014. "Micro-, Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises with High-Growth Potential in the Southern Mediterranean: Identifying Obstacles and Policy Responses," CEPS Papers 8796, Centre for European Policy Studies.

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