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Does the expansion of higher education increase the equality of educational opportunities? Evidence from Italy

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  • Massimiliano Bratti

    ()
    (Univesrity of Milan)

  • Daniele Checchi

    ()
    (Univesrity of Milan)

  • Guido de Blasio

    ()
    (Bank of Italy)

Abstract

This paper studies the role of the expansion of higher education supply in increasing the equality of post-secondary education opportunities. It examines ItalyÂ’s experience during the 1990s, when policy changes prompted universities to offer a wider range of degree courses and to open new campuses. Our analysis focuses on full-time students (not older than 31); the results suggest that the expansion had only limited effects in terms of reducing individual inequality in higher education achievement. That is, the greater availability of courses had a significant positive impact only on the probability of enrolment, not on that of obtaining a university degree, while the opening of new campuses had no effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area in its series Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) with number 679.

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Date of creation: Jun 2008
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Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_679_08

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Keywords: Higher Education; family background; Italy;

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