Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Drift to Private Schools in Australia: Understanding its Features

Contents:

Author Info

  • Chris Ryan
  • Louise Watson

Abstract

Government subsidies have provided a major source of funds to private schools in Australia for three decades. The increasing level of private school subsidies since the mid-1970s has contributed to a steady increase in the proportion of students enrolled in private schools. This growth in the private school share of enrolments was not inevitable, but has been the outcome of government policies. We use an economic framework that focuses jointly on the price and quality of schooling and find that private schools have used government subsidies to increase the quality of their services (ie. to reduce staff: student ratios) rather than to reduce their fees. This strategy has ensured that the 10 percentage point increase in the enrolment share of private schools since 1975 has not substantially altered the socio-economic composition of their student body. One consequence is that a higher proportion of government school students now come from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds than 30 years ago. Therefore, schools in the government sector now educate more students from lower SES backgrounds than in 1975. The implications for public policy of these phenomena are discussed and directions for future research identified.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://cbe.anu.edu.au/research/papers/ceprdpapers/DP479.pdf
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 404 Not Found. If this is indeed the case, please notify ()
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 479.

as in new window
Length: 49 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:479

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Canberra, ACT 0200
Phone: +61 2 6125 3807
Fax: +61 2 6125 0744
Email:
Web page: http://rse.anu.edu.au/cepr.php
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: private schooling; choice; government subsidies; student background;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Francis Vella, 1999. "Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference? Evidence from Australia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 208-224.
  2. Alan B. Krueger, 2000. "Economic Considerations and class size," Working Papers, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing. 975, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
  3. Williams, Ross A, 1985. "The Economic Determinants of Private Schooling in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 61(174), pages 622-28, September.
  4. Summers, Anita A & Wolfe, Barbara L, 1977. "Do Schools Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 639-52, September.
  5. Henderson, Vernon & Mieszkowski, Peter & Sauvageau, Yvon, 1978. "Peer group effects and educational production functions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 97-106, August.
  6. Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller, 2003. "Choice of School in Australia: Determinants and Consequences," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(1), pages 55-78.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:479. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.