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Well-being of Women in New Zealand: The Changing Landscape

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  • Jessica Dye

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Auckland University of Technology)

  • Stephanie Rossouw

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Auckland University of Technology)

  • Gail Pacheco

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Auckland University of Technology)

Abstract

As the first country to give women the right to vote in 1893, New Zealand (NZ) has often been viewed as a leader in the global movement towards gender equality. This paper aims to assess trends in overall well-being for NZ women, by pulling together a range of statistical indicators across five key facets of well-being: demographic and family changes, education, employment, health, and crime and violence. From our analysis two contrasting pictures emerge. The first is that NZ women are clearly making up ground in respect of their education, participation in the labour force (less so in terms of wage equality), and overall health outcomes (barring mental health issues, such as depression). In the second, however, NZ women are trailing behind their other developed nation counterparts when one considers crime and violence, both committed against and by them.

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File URL: http://www.aut.ac.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/304219/Economics-WP-2012-07.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2012-07.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201207

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Keywords: Gender equality; women's well-being;

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  1. David Fergusson & Sheree J. Gibb, 2009. "Sources of the Gender Wage Gap in a New Zealand Birth Cohort," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 12(3), pages 281-298.
  2. Robert H. Haveman & Barbara L. Wolfe, 1984. "Schooling and Economic Well-Being: The Role of Nonmarket Effects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(3), pages 377-407.
  3. Dennis D. Kimko & Eric A. Hanushek, 2000. "Schooling, Labor-Force Quality, and the Growth of Nations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1184-1208, December.
  4. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
  5. Pacheco, Gail A. & Cruickshank, Amy A., 2007. "Minimum wage effects on educational enrollments in New Zealand," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 574-587, October.
  6. Scott Fargher & Stefan Kesting & Thomas Lange & Gail Pacheco, 2008. "Cultural heritage and job satisfaction in Eastern and Western Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 29(7), pages 630-650, November.
  7. John Gibson, 2000. "Sheepskin effects and the returns to education in New Zealand: Do they differ by ethnic groups?," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 201-220.
  8. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, May.
  9. Dean R. Hyslop & David C. Maré, 2005. "Understanding New Zealand's Changing Income Distribution, 1983-1998: A Semi-parametric Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(3), pages 469-495, 08.
  10. Barbara L. Wolfe & Robert H. Haveman, 2002. "Social and nonmarket benefits from education in an advanced economy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 47(Jun), pages 97-142.
  11. Kerry Papps, 2010. "Earnings inequality and gender in New Zealand, 1998-2008," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 217-229.
  12. Gail Pacheco, 2011. "Estimating Employment Impacts with Binding Minimum Wage Constraints," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(279), pages 587-602, December.
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