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The Economics of Agricultural and Wildlife Smuggling

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Author Info

  • Ferrier, Peyton Michael

Abstract

The United States bans imports of certain agricultural and wildlife goods that can carry pathogens or diseases or whose harvest can threaten wildlife stocks or endanger species. Despite these bans, contraband is regularly uncovered in inspections of cargo containers and in domestic markets. This study characterizes the economic factors affecting agricultural and wildlife smuggling by drawing on inspection and interdiction data from USDA and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and existing economic literature. Findings reveal that agricultural and wildlife smuggling primarily include luxury goods, ethnic foods, and specialty goods, such as traditional medicines. Incidents of detected smuggling are disproportionately higher for agricultural goods originating in China and for wildlife goods originating in Mexico. Fragmentary data show that approximately 1 percent of all commercial wildlife shipments to the United States and 0.40 percent of all U.S. wildlife imports by value are refused entry and suspected of being smuggled.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/55951
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Economic Research Report with number 55951.

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Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:55951

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Related research

Keywords: Smuggling; illicit trade; SPS; quarantine; endangered species; CITES; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Financial Economics;

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References

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  1. Thursby, M. & Jensen, R. & Thursby, J., 1991. "Smuggling, Camouflaging, and Market Structure," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1005, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  2. Stefano DellaVigna & Eliana La Ferrara, 2007. "Detecting Illegal Arms Trade," NBER Working Papers 13355, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Fischer, Carolyn, 2004. "The complex interactions of markets for endangered species products," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 926-953, September.
  4. Lynch, Lori & Lichtenberg, Erik, 2006. "Foreword: Special Issue on Invasive Species," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 35(1), April.
  5. Kate Ivanova, 2007. "Corruption, illegal trade and compliance with the Montreal Protocol," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 38(4), pages 475-496, December.
  6. Ferrier, Peyton Michael, 2008. "Illicit Agricultural Trade," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 37(2), October.
  7. Dean Yang, 2004. "Can Enforcement Backfire? Crime Displacement in the Context of Customs Reform in the Philippines," Working Papers 520, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  8. Heltberg, Rasmus, 2001. "Impact of the ivory trade ban on poaching incentives: a numerical example," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 189-195, February.
  9. Kemp, Murray C., 1976. "Smuggling and optimal commercial policy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3-4), pages 381-384.
  10. Raymond Fisman & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "The Smuggling of Art, and the Art of Smuggling: Uncovering the Illicit Trade in Cultural Property and Antiques," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(3), pages 82-96, July.
  11. Feinstein, Jonathan S, 1999. "Approaches for Estimating Noncompliance: Examples from Federal Taxation in the United States," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(456), pages F360-69, June.
  12. Saba, Richard P, et al, 1995. "The Demand for Cigarette Smuggling," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(2), pages 189-202, April.
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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. The Economics of Agricultural and Wildlife Smuggling
    by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-01-31 08:01:19
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Mohammad Hossien Pourkazemi & Mohammad Naser Sherafat & Zahra Delfan Azari, 2013. "A Fuzzy Logic Approach to Estimate the Import of Smuggling in Iran," Iranian Economic Review, Economics faculty of Tehran university, vol. 18(2), pages 107-129, spring.
  2. Ferrier, Peyton, 2010. "Irradiation as a quarantine treatment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 548-555, December.

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