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Unscrambling Africa: Regional Requirements for Achieving Food Security

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  • Haggblade, Steven
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    Abstract

    Africa has inherited highly arbitrary political borders that vastly complicate current efforts to accelerate agricultural growth and reduce hunger. Because Africa’s inherited political borders arbitrarily partition agro-ecological zones and natural market sheds, current country borders serve as barriers, hampering agricultural technology transfer, hindering agricultural trade and dampening incentives for farmers and agribusinesses to invest in Africa’s many regional breadbasket zones. Feasible solutions revolve around neutralizing these deleterious effects through regional scientific networks and regional corridor development programs.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 97030.

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    Date of creation: Oct 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:97030

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    Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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    Keywords: Africa; Food Security; markets; technology transfer; Agricultural and Food Policy; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Crop Production/Industries; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Marketing; R12; Q18;

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    1. Buys, Piet & Deichmann, Uwe & Wheeler, David, 2006. "Road network upgrading and overland trade expansion in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4097, The World Bank.
    2. Pardey, Philip G. & Beintema, Nienke M. & Dehmer, Steven & Wood, Stanley, 2006. "Agricultural research: a growing global divide?," Food policy reports, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Abdulai, Awudu & Johnson, Michael & Diao, Xinshen, 2006. "Leveraging regional growth dynamics in African agriculture," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 1(1), December.
    4. Govereh, Jones & Haggblade, Steven & Nielson, Hunter & Tschirley, David L., 2008. "Maize Market Sheds in Eastern and Southern Africa. Report 1," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55374, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Abdulai, Awudu & Diao, Xinshen & Johnson, Michael, 2005. "Achieving regional growth dynamics in African agriculture," DSGD discussion papers 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Tschirley, David L. & Nijhoff, Jan J. & Arlindo, Pedro & Mwiinga, Billy & Weber, Michael T. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2006. "Anticipating and Responding to Drought Emergencies in Southern Africa: Lessons from the 2002-2003 Experience," Food Security International Development Working Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 54564, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Xinshen Diao & Derek Headey & Michael Johnson, 2008. "Toward a green revolution in Africa: what would it achieve, and what would it require?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 539-550, November.
    8. Dave D. Weatherspoon & Thomas Reardon, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa: Implications for Agrifood Systems and the Rural Poor," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 21, pages 333-355, 05.
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