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Feeding the Cities and Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Beyond the Food Miles Approach

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  • de Cara, Stephane
  • Fournier, Anne
  • Gaigne, Carl

Abstract

In this paper, we study the impact of urbanization on the location of agricultural production and the GHG emissions related to transportation activities. We develop an economic geography model where the location of agricultural activities and urban population are endogenous. We show that increasing agricultural yields induce the spatial concentration of agricultural production in the least urbanized region if agricultural transport costs are relatively low and in the most urbanized region otherwise. In addition, interregional trade in agricultural commodities is desirable to reduce GHG emissions, except when urban population is equally split between cities. However, the market may induce too much agglomeration of agricultural production when yields are high and when collection costs are low.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/114350
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland with number 114350.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae11:114350

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Related research

Keywords: Urbanization; agriculture location; transport; Environmental Economics and Policy; Food Security and Poverty; Q10; Q54; R12;

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  1. Henry G. Overman & Diego Puga & Matthew A. Turner, 2007. "Decomposing the growth in residential land in the United States," Working Papers tecipa-278, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  2. Carl Gaigné & Stéphane Riou & Jacques-François Thisse, 2010. "Are compact cities environmentally friendly?," Working Papers 1001, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  3. Jean Cavailhes & Carl Gaigne & Jacques-Rrancois Thisse, 2006. "Trade and the structure of cities," KIER Working Papers 623, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
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