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A Monthly Cycle In Food Expenditure And Intake By Participants In The U.S. Food Stamp Program

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Author Info

  • Wilde, Parke E.
  • Ranney, Christine K.

Abstract

This paper uses nationally representative data to describe a monthly cycle in food expenditure and food intake by food stamp recipients. Food expenditure peaks sharply in the fIrst three days after food stamps are received. Actual food intake drops at the end of the month, for some foods and some people, although food intake over time is always smoother than food expenditure. The food stamp cycle has implications for two areas of research: the measurement ofhunger and food insecurity in the United States, and the measurement ofthe impact ofthe U.S. Food Stamp Program.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management in its series Working Papers with number 127820.

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Date of creation: Mar 1997
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Handle: RePEc:ags:cudawp:127820

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Related research

Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics; Food Security and Poverty;

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References

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  1. Moffitt, Robert, 1989. "Estimating the Value of an In-Kind Transfer: The Case of Food Stamps," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 385-409, March.
  2. Parke E. Wilde & Christine K. Ranney, 2000. "The Monthly Food Stamp Cycle: Shooping Frequency and Food Intake Decisions in an Endogenous Switching Regression Framework," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(1), pages 200-213.
  3. Wilde, Parke E. & Ranney, Christine K., 1996. "The Distinct Impact Of Food Stamps On Food Spending," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 21(01), July.
  4. E. A. Frongillo Jr. & C. M. Olson & B. S Rauschenbach & A. Kendall, . "Nutritional Consequences of Food Insecurity in a Rural New York State County," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1120-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  5. Meghir, Costas & Robin, Jean-Marc, 1992. "Frequency of purchase and the estimation of demand systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1-3), pages 53-85.
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Cited by:
  1. von Hinke Kessler Scholder, SM, . "School meal crowd out in the 1980s," Working Papers 6942, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.
  2. Jayanta Bhattacharya & Thomas DeLeire & Steven Haider & Janet Currie, 2002. "Heat or Eat? Cold Weather Shocks and Nutrition in Poor American Families," NBER Working Papers 9004, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Beatrice Lorge Rogers & Jennifer Coates, 2002. "Food-Based Safety Nets and Related Programs," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 12, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

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