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Childhood Malnutrition In China: Change Of Inequality In A Decade

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  • Chen, Zhuo
  • Eastwood, David B.
  • Yen, Steven T.

Abstract

A concentration index methodology to analyze the inequality in childhood malnutrition in China is outlined. Height-for-age z score is used as a measure of childhood malnutrition. Using household survey data from nine Chinese provinces, it is found that per-capita household income, household head's education, urban residence and access to a bus stop reduced malnutrition. Child's age had a nonlinear effect on the malnutrition status. Income growth and access to public transportation reduced the inequality, while rural-urban gap, provincial differentiation, and unequal distribution of household head's education increased inequality in childhood malnutrition. Gender is not a factor in either malnutrition status or inequality. Investments in infrastructure and welfare programs are recommended to reduce the inequality.

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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI with number 19205.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea05:19205

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Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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  1. Banister, Judith & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2005. "China, Economic Development and Mortality Decline," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 21-41, January.
  2. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
  3. Wagstaff, Adam & Van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2001. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2714, The World Bank.
  4. Andrea Carlson & Ben Senauer, 2003. "The Impact of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children on Child Health," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 479-491.
  5. Jamison, Dean T., 1986. "Child malnutrition and school performance in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 299-309, March.
  6. Liu, Yuanli & Hsiao, William C. & Eggleston, Karen, 1999. "Equity in health and health care: the Chinese experience," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(10), pages 1349-1356, November.
  7. Henderson, Gail & Akin, John & Zhiming, Li & Shuigao, Jin & Haijiang, Ma & Keyou, Ge, 1994. "Equity and the utilization of health services: Report of an eight-province survey in China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 687-699, September.
  8. Dennis Tao Yang, 1997. "Education in Production: Measuring Labor Quality and Management," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 764-772.
  9. Liu, Gordon G. & Zhao, Zhongyun & Cai, Renhua & Yamada, Tetsuji & Yamada, Tadashi, 2002. "Equity in health care access to: assessing the urban health insurance reform in China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(10), pages 1779-1794, November.
  10. Robert A. Moffitt, 2003. "Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number moff03-1, July.
  11. Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Paci, Pierella, 1989. "Equity in the Finance and Delivery of Health Care: Some Tentative Cross-country Comparisons," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 89-112, Spring.
  12. Du, Shufa & Mroz, Tom A. & Zhai, Fengying & Popkin, Barry M., 2004. "Rapid income growth adversely affects diet quality in China--particularly for the poor!," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(7), pages 1505-1515, October.
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