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Psychiatric disorders and labor market outcomes: evidence from the National Latino and Asian American Study

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  • Pinka Chatterji
  • Margarita Alegr�a

    (Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research, Cambridge Health Alliance|Harvard Medical School, USA)

  • Mingshan Lu

    (Department of Economics, University of Calgary, Canada)

  • David Takeuchi

    (Department of Sociology & School of Social Work, University of Washington, USA)

Abstract

This paper investigates to what extent psychiatric disorders and mental distress affect labor market outcomes in two rapidly growing populations that have not been studied to date-ethnic minorities of Latino and Asian descent, most of whom are immigrants. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), we examine the labor market effects of meeting diagnostic criteria for any psychiatric disorder in the past 12 months as well as the effects of psychiatric distress in the past year. The labor market outcomes analyzed are current employment status, the number of weeks worked in the past year among those who are employed, and having at least one work absence in the past month among those who are employed. Among Latinos, psychiatric disorders and mental distress are associated with detrimental effects on employment and absenteeism, similar to effects found in previous analyses of mostly white, American born populations. Among Asians, we find more mixed evidence that psychiatric disorders and mental distress detract from labor market outcomes. Our findings suggest that reducing disparities and expanding access to effective treatment may have significant labor market benefits-not just for majority populations, as has been demonstrated, but also for Asians and Latinos. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2007)
Issue (Month): 10 ()
Pages: 1069-1090

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:10:p:1069-1090

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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Cited by:
  1. Salma Ahmed & Ranjan Ray, 2014. "Health consequences of child labour in Bangladesh," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(4), pages 111-150, January.
  2. Tefft, Nathan, 2012. "Mental health and employment: The SAD story," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 242-255.
  3. Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Anton & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2011. "Early Life Health and Adult Earnings: Evidence from a Large Sample of Siblings and Twins," IZA Discussion Papers 5804, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Alcántara, Carmela & Chen, Chih-Nan & Alegría, Margarita, 2014. "Do post-migration perceptions of social mobility matter for Latino immigrant health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 94-106.
  5. Johnston, David W. & Schurer, Stefanie & Shields, Michael A., 2011. "Evidence on the Long Shadow of Poor Mental Health across Three Generations," IZA Discussion Papers 6014, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Chatterji, Pinka & Alegria, Margarita & Takeuchi, David, 2011. "Psychiatric disorders and labor market outcomes: Evidence from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 858-868.
  7. Maren M. Michaelsen, 2012. "Mental Health and Labour Supply: Evidence from Mexico’s Ongoing Violent Conflicts," HiCN Working Papers 117, Households in Conflict Network.
  8. Johnston, David W. & Schurer, Stefanie & Shields, Michael A., 2013. "Exploring the intergenerational persistence of mental health: Evidence from three generations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1077-1089.
  9. repec:ese:iserwp:2009-31 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Chang, Hung-Hao & Yen, Steven T., 2011. "Full-time, part-time employment and life satisfaction of the elderly," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 815-823.
  11. Linda Dynan, 2009. "The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 213-223, September.
  12. Victoria D. Ojeda & Richard G. Frank & Thomas G. McGuire & Todd P. Gilmer, 2010. "Mental illness, nativity, gender and labor supply," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 396-421.
  13. Lizhong Peng & Chad D. Meyerhoefer & Samuel H. Zuvekas, 2013. "The Effect of Depression on Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 19451, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Chang, Hung-Hao, 2013. "Does Food Consumption Away From Home Make You Happier? An Empirical Investigation of the Elderly in Taiwan," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C., Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 149927, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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