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Month of Birth and Children’s Health in India

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  • Michael Lokshin
  • Sergiy Radyakin

Abstract

We use data from three waves of India National Family Health Survey to explore the relationship between the month of birth and the health outcomes of young children in India. We find that children born during the monsoon months have lower anthropometric scores compared to children born during the fall-winter months. We propose and test hypotheses that could explain such a correlation. Our results emphasize the importance of seasonal variations in environmental conditions at the time of birth in determining health outcomes of young children in India. Policy interventions that affect these conditions could effectively impact the health and achievements of these children, in a manner similar to nutrition and micronutrient supplementation programs.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/47/1/174
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 47 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 174-203

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2012:i:1:p:174-203

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Higuchi, Katsuhiko & Suhaeti, Rita Nur, 2009. "Impacts of prenatal and environmental factors on child growth: Evidence from Indonesia," IFPRI discussion papers 933, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Mitrut, Andreea & Wolff, François-Charles, 2011. "The impact of legalized abortion on child health outcomes and abandonment. Evidence from Romania," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1219-1231.
  3. Schultz, Paul, 2009. "Population and Health Policies," Working Papers 66, Yale University, Department of Economics.
  4. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2011. "Prenatal seasonality, child growth, and schooling investments: Evidence from rural Indonesia," IFPRI discussion papers 1108, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2012. "Long-term Impacts of Rice Price and Production Seasonality on Human Capital: Evidence from Rural Indonesia," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126163, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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