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Assimilation via Prices or Quantities?: Sources of Immigrant Earnings Growth in Australia, Canada, and the United States

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Author Info

  • Heather Antecol
  • Peter Kuhn
  • Stephen J. Trejo

Abstract

Using 1980/81 and 1990/91 census data from Australia, Canada, and the United States, we estimate the effects of time in the destination country on male immigrants’ wages, employment, and earnings. We find that total earnings assimilation is greatest in the United States and least in Australia. Employment assimilation explains all of the earnings progress experienced by Australian immigrants, whereas wage assimilation plays the dominant role in the United States, and Canada falls in between. We argue that relatively inflexible wages and generous unemployment insurance in countries like Australia may cause assimilation to occur along the quantity rather than the price dimension.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 41 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:41:y:2006:i:4:p821-840

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Frank Walsh, 2013. "Labour Market Regulation and Migration in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(1), pages 85–102.
  2. Duncan, Brian & Trejo, Stephen, 2011. "Low-Skilled Immigrants and the U.S. Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 5964, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Skuterud, Mikal & Su, Mingcui, 2009. "Immigrant Wage Assimilation and the Return to Foreign and Host-Country Sources of Human Capital," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-38, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Jun 2009.
  4. Chiswick, Barry R. & Le, Anh T. & Miller, Paul W., 2006. "How Immigrants Fare Across the Earnings Distribution: International Analyses," IZA Discussion Papers 2405, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Casey Warman, 2007. "You Can Take it with You! The Returns to Foreign Human Capital of Male Temporary Foreign Workers," Working Papers 1125, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  6. Daniel Hamermesh & Stephen Trejo, 2013. "How do immigrants spend their time? The process of assimilation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 507-530, April.
  7. Jonathan Wadsworth & Augustin de Coulon, 2008. "On the Relative Gains to Immigration: A Comparison of the Labour Market Position of Indians in the USA, the UK and India," CEP Discussion Papers dp0851, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. George J. Borjas, 2013. "The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again," NBER Working Papers 19116, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Ken Clark & Joanne Lindley, 2009. "Immigrant assimilation pre and post labour market entry: evidence from the UK Labour Force Survey," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 175-198, January.
  10. Brian Duncan & Stephen Trejo, 2009. "Immigration and the U.S. Labor Market," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0908, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  11. Mario Izquierdo & Aitor Lacuesta & Raquel Vegas, 2009. "Assimilation of immigrants in Spain: A longitudinal analysis," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 0904, Banco de Espa�a.
  12. Lozano, Fernando A. & Steinberger, Michael D., 2010. "Empirical Methods in the Economics of International Immigration," IZA Discussion Papers 5328, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Sónia Cabral & Cláudia Duarte, 2013. "Mind the gap! The relative wages of immigrants in the Portuguese labour market," Working Papers w201305, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  14. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Stephen J. Trejo, 2010. "How Do Immigrants Spend Time?: The Process of Assimilation," NBER Working Papers 16430, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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