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Estimating the Determinants of Child Health When Fertility and Mortality Are Selective

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  • Mark M. Pitt

Abstract

This paper estimates the determinants of child mortality and child health allowing for the possibility that samples of children are choice-based, reflecting prior selective fertility and mortality behavior. Parameter identification is the most serious practical problem in controlling for fertility and mortality selection. Identification is achieved by imposing a random-effects structure on the error correlation matrix for the set of fertility, mortality, and health behaviors. Fertility selection is found to be statistically significant in the estimation of the determinants of mortality in all 14 Sub-Saharan DHS data sets studied, and fertility and mortality selection is found to be significant in the determination of child height in Zambia. Nevertheless, most parameters are little changed when selection is accounted for.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 32 (1997)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 129-158

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:32:y:1997:i:1:p:129-158

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Glick, Peter & Sahn, David E., 1999. "Schooling of girls and boys in a West African country: the effects of parental education, income, and household structure," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 63-87, February.
  2. Mauricio Reis, 2014. "Public primary health care and children’s health in Brazil: evidence from siblings," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 421-445, April.
  3. Harounan Kazianga & Stefan Klonner, 2009. "The Intra-household Economics of Polygyny: Fertility and Child Mortality in Rural Mali," Economics Working Paper Series, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business 0902, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
  4. Charles Baum, 2012. "The effects of food stamp receipt on weight gained by expectant mothers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 1307-1340, October.
  5. Jere R. Behrman & John Hoddinott & John A. Maluccio & Reynaldo Martorell, 2009. "Brains versus Brawn: Labor Market Returns to Intellectual and Health Human Capital in a Poor Developing Country," Middlebury College Working Paper Series, Middlebury College, Department of Economics 0907, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  6. Maitra, Pushkar & Pal, Sarmistha, 2007. "Birth Spacing, Fertility Selection and Child Survival: Analysis Using a Correlated Hazard Model," IZA Discussion Papers 2878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. John Maluccio & John Hoddinott & Jere R. Behrman & Reynaldo Martorell & Agnes R. Quisumbing & Aryeh D. Stein, 2006. "The Impact of Nutrition during Early Childhood on Education among Guatemalan Adults," Middlebury College Working Paper Series, Middlebury College, Department of Economics 0614, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  8. Carletto, Calogero & Covarrubias, Katia & Maluccio, John A., 2011. "Migration and child growth in rural Guatemala," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 16-27, February.
  9. Manan Roy, 2014. "How well does the U.S. Government provide health insurance for infants?," Empirical Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 253-284, February.
  10. Pitt, Mark M. & Khandker, Shahidur R. & Cartwright, Jennifer, 2003. "Does micro-credit empower women : evidence from Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 2998, The World Bank.
  11. Eric Jensen & Dennis Ahlburg, 2002. "Family Size, Unwantedness, And Child Health And Health Care Utilisation In Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 43-59.
  12. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 1998. "Determinants of child health during the economic transition in Romania," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 26(11), pages 2045-2056, November.
  13. Masayuki Kudamatsu, 2012. "Has Democratization Reduced Infant Mortality In Sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence From Micro Data," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1294-1317, December.
  14. Santosh Kumar & Ramona Molitor & Sebastian Vollmer, 2014. "Children of Drought: Rainfall Shocks and Early Child Health in Rural India," Working Papers, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business 1407, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
  15. Hoddinott, John & Maluccio, John & Behrman, Jere R. & Martorell, Reynaldo & Melgar, Paul & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Ramirez-Zea, Manuel & Stein, Aryeh D. & Yount, Kathryn M., 2011. "The consequences of early childhood growth failure over the life course:," IFPRI discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1073, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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