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Gender Segregation in Small Firms

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Author Info

  • William J. Carrington
  • Kenneth R. Troske

Abstract

This paper studies interfirm gender segregation in a unique sample of small employers. We find that interfirm segregation is prevalent among small employers, as men and women rarely work in fully integrated firms. We also find that the education and sex of the business owner strongly influence the sex composition of a firm's workforce. Finally, we estimate that interfirm segregation can account for up to 50 percent of the gender gap in annual earnings.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 30 (1995)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 503-533

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:3:p:503-533

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Kurtulus, Fidan Ana & Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald, 2012. "Do Women Top Managers Help Women Advance? A Panel Study Using EEO-1 Records," IZA Discussion Papers 6444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Michael Baker & Nicole M. Fortin, 1998. "Gender Composition and Wages: Why is Canada different from the United States?," Working Papers baker-98-02, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  3. Michael Baker & Nicole M. Fortin, 2001. "Occupational gender composition and wages in Canada, 1987-1988," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 345-376, May.
  4. Kenneth R Troske & William J Carrington, 1996. "Sex Segregation in U.S. Manufacturing," Working Papers 96-4, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  5. Baker, Michael Fortin, Nicole, 2000. "The Gender Composition and Wages: Why is Canada Different from the United States?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000140e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  6. José A. Pagán & Miren Ullibarri, 2000. "Group Heterogeneity and the Gender Earnings Gap in Mexico," Economia Mexicana NUEVA EPOCA, , vol. 0(1), pages 23-40, January-J.
  7. Francine D. Blau & Patricia Simpson & Deborah Anderson, 1998. "Continuing Progress? Trends in Occupational Segregation in the United States Over the 1970s and 1980s," NBER Working Papers 6716, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Hutchens, Robert, 2001. "Numerical measures of segregation: desirable properties and their implications," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 13-29, July.
  9. Michael Baker & Nicole Fortin, 2000. "Comparable Worth Comes to the Private Sector: The Case of Ontario," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0266, Econometric Society.

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