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Deserters, Social Norms, and Migration

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  • Dora L. Costa
  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

Fourteen percent of Union Army soldiers were deserters. Were these men, who were known in their home communities to have failed cause and comrades, reintegrated into their communities? We construct a rich micropanel data set of U.S. Civil War soldiers from pro-war and anti-war communities to present new evidence on how community social norms shape soldiers’ postwar experiences. Relative to control groups, deserters were more likely to leave home, particularly if they were from pro-war communities, to move to anti-war communities and to reinvent themselves by changing their names.

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File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/resolve?id=doi:10.1086/511321
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal The Journal of Law and Economics.

Volume (Year): 50 (2007)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 323-353

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:v:50:y:2007:p:323-353

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JLE/

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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. The Economics of Green Identity or How to Get Newt and Al Gore to Hold Hands and Jointly Support Reducing GHG Emissions
    by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2012-01-21 18:04:00
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Cited by:
  1. Guiso, Luigi & Sapienza, Paola & Zingales, Luigi, 2008. "Long Term Persistence," CEPR Discussion Papers 6981, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Dora Costa, 2011. "Leaders: Privilege, Sacrifice, Opportunity and Personnel Economics in the American Civil War," NBER Working Papers 17382, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Dora Costa, 2012. "Scarring and Mortality Selection Among Civil War POWs: A Long-Term Mortality, Morbidity, and Socioeconomic Follow-Up," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1185-1206, November.
  4. Yamamura, Eiji, 2008. "The role of social capital in homogeneous society: Review of recent researches in Japan," MPRA Paper 11385, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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