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Why Does Spousal Education Matter for Earnings? Assortative Mating and Cross-Productivity

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  • Chong Huang
  • Hongbin Li
  • Pak Wai Liu
  • Junsen Zhang

Abstract

Spousal education is correlated with earnings for two reasons: cross-productivity between couples and assortative mating. This article empirically disentangles the two effects by using Chinese twins data. We have two innovations: using twins data to control for the unobserved mating effect in our estimations and estimating both current and wedding-time earnings equations. We find that both crossproductivity and mating are important in explaining the current earnings. Although the mating effect exists for both husbands and wives, the cross-productivity effect mainly runs from Chinese husbands to wives. Our findings shed light on the theories of human capital, marriage, and the family. (c) 2009 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 633-652

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:27:y:2009:i:4:p:633-652

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. Eiji Yamamura & Yukichi Mano, 2012. "An Investigation into the Positive Effect of an Educated Wife on Her Husband’s Earnings: The Case of Japan in the Period between 2000 and 2003," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 409-416, November.
  2. Mano, Yukichi & Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Human Capital Accumulation through Interaction between a Married Couple: Comparison between a Housewife and a Working Wife," MPRA Paper 28936, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Yukichi Mano & Eiji Yamamura, 2011. "Effects of Husband's Education and Family Structure on Labor Force Participation and Married Japanese Women's Earnings," Japanese Economy, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 38(3), pages 71-91, October.
  4. Yamamura, Eiji & Mano, Yukichi, 2010. "The Relationship Between the Effects of a Wife’s Education on her Husband’s Earnings and her Labor Participation: Japan in the period 2000 -2003," MPRA Paper 22439, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Mano, Yukichi & Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "The Influence of a wife’s working status on her husband’s accumulation of human capital," MPRA Paper 37247, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Externality of young children on parents’ watching of anime: Evidence from Japanese micro data," MPRA Paper 46878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Martin Dribe & Paul Nystedt, 2013. "Educational Homogamy and Gender-Specific Earnings: Sweden, 1990–2009," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1197-1216, August.

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