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Benefits of Women's Education within Marriage

In: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital

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  • Lee Benham
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  • Theodore W. Schultz, 1974. "Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number schu74-1.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 2972.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:2972

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    Cited by:
    1. Brynin, Malcolm & Francesconi, Marco, 2002. "The material returns to partnership: the effects of educational matching on labour market outcomes and gender equality," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Lundberg, Shelly, 2005. "Men and islands: Dealing with the family in empirical labor economics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 591-612, August.
    3. B. Wolfe & S. Zuvekas, . "Nonmarket outcomes of schooling," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1065-95, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    4. Eiji Yamamura & Yukichi Mano, 2012. "An Investigation into the Positive Effect of an Educated Wife on Her Husband’s Earnings: The Case of Japan in the Period between 2000 and 2003," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 409-416, November.
    5. Barbara L. Wolfe & Robert H. Haveman, 2002. "Social and nonmarket benefits from education in an advanced economy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 47(Jun), pages 97-142.
    6. Basu, Kaushik & Narayan, Ambar & Ravallion, Martin, 2001. "Is literacy shared within households? Theory and evidence for Bangladesh," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(6), pages 649-665, December.
    7. Elisabetta Lazzaro & Carlofilippo Frateschi, 2008. "Attendance to cultural events and spousal influences: the Italian case," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0084, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    8. Vijverberg, Wim P. M., 1995. "Returns to schooling in non-farm self-employment: An econometric case study of Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(7), pages 1215-1227, July.
    9. Madeline Zavodny, 2008. "Is there a ‘marriage premium’ for gay men?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 369-389, December.
    10. Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K. & Jeng Lin, Chyongchiou, 1999. "Family background and returns to schooling in Taiwan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 113-125, February.
    11. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Externality of young children on parents’ watching of anime: Evidence from Japanese micro data," MPRA Paper 46878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Åström, Johanna, 2009. "The Effects of Assortative Mating on Earnings: Human Capital Spillover or Specialization?," HUI Working Papers 34, HUI Research.
    13. Mohammad Niaz Asadullah, 2006. "Returns to Education in Bangladesh," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 453-468.
    14. Beneria, Lourdes, 1995. "Toward a greater integration of gender in economics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1839-1850, November.
    15. Martin Dribe & Paul Nystedt, 2013. "Educational Homogamy and Gender-Specific Earnings: Sweden, 1990–2009," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1197-1216, August.
    16. Claudia D. Goldin & Donald O. Parsons, 1981. "Economic Well-Being and Child Labor: The Inter action of Family and Industry," NBER Working Papers 0707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Chong Huang & Hongbin Li & Pak Wai Liu & Junsen Zhang, 2006. "Why Does Spousal Education Matter for Earnings? Assortative Mating or Cross-productivity," Discussion Papers 00020, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
    18. Krenz, Astrid, 2013. "Cross-country heterogeneity and endogeneity bias in life satisfaction estimations - Macro- and micro-level evidence for advanced, developing and transition countries," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 155, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    19. Claudia Goldin, 1995. "Career and Family: College Women Look to the Past," NBER Working Papers 5188, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Choi, Hyung-Jai & Joesch, Jutta M. & Lundberg, Shelly, 2008. "Sons, daughters, wives, and the labour market outcomes of West German men," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 795-811, October.
    21. Åström, Johanna, 2011. "The Effects of Spousal Education on Individual Earnings – A Study of Married Swedish Couples," HUI Working Papers 32, HUI Research.

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