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The Influence of a wife’s working status on her husband’s accumulation of human capital

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  • Mano, Yukichi
  • Yamamura, Eiji

Abstract

Japanese household-level data describing a husband's earnings, his wife's working status, and their schooling levels are used to test the implications of a model proposing a time-consuming process of human capital accumulation within marriages, in which an educated wife is more productive. The empirical results support the model’s predictions: in particular (i) a non-working wife's schooling has a greater positive effect on her husband's earnings than a working wife’s schooling; and (ii) the effect of a non-working wife's schooling increases with the length of marriage, whereas the effect of a working wife’s schooling does not change over the course of marriage.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 37247.

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Date of creation: 05 Mar 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37247

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Keywords: Human capital; wife's working status;

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