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Alternative Measures of Offshorability: A Survey Approach

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  • Alan S. Blinder
  • Alan B. Krueger

Abstract

This article reports on household survey measurements of the “offshorability” of jobs, defined as the ability to perform the work from abroad. We develop multiple measures of offshorability, using both self-reporting and professional coders. All measures find that roughly 25% of US jobs are offshorable. Our three preferred measures agree between 70% and 80% of the time. Professional coders appear to provide the most accurate assessments. Empirically, more educated workers appear to hold somewhat more offshorable jobs, and offshorability does not have systematic effects on either wages or the probability of layoff.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 31 (2013)
Issue (Month): S1 ()
Pages: S97 - S128

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/669061

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References

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  1. Morris M. Kleiner & Alan B. Krueger, 2010. "The Prevalence and Effects of Occupational Licensing," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(4), pages 676-687, December.
  2. Jagdish Bhagwati & Alan S. Blinder, 2009. "Offshoring of American Jobs: What Response from U.S. Economic Policy?," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262013320 edited by Benjamin M. Friedman, December.
  3. Katharine G. Abraham & James R. Spletzer & Michael Harper, 2010. "Labor in the New Economy," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number abra08-1.
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Cited by:
  1. Rosario Crinò, 2010. "Service Offshoring and the Skill Composition of Labor Demand," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 802.10, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  2. Wright, Greg C., 2014. "Revisiting the employment impact of offshoring," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 63-83.
  3. David H. Autor, 2013. "The "Task Approach" to Labor Markets: An Overview," NBER Working Papers 18711, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Thomas Kemeny & David Rigby, 2012. "Trading away what kind of jobs? Globalization, trade and tasks in the US economy," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 148(1), pages 1-16, April.
  5. Wei, Xuan & Meng, Xianwei, 2013. "A Structural Estimation of the Employment Effects of Offshoring in the U.S. Labor Market," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150730, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  6. David H. Autor & David Dorn, 2009. "The Growth of Low Skill Service Jobs and the Polarization of the U.S. Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 15150, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Wei, Xuan & Meng, Xianwei & Thornsbury, Suzanne, 2013. "A Structural Estimation of the Employment Effects of Offshoring in the U.S. Labor Market," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151278, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  8. Hugo Rojas-Romagosa, 2011. "Wage inequality in trade-in-tasks models," CPB Discussion Paper 196, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  9. Petri, Böckerman & Seppo, Laaksonen & Jari, Vainiomäki, 2013. "Is there job polarization at the firm level?," MPRA Paper 50833, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Cosimo Beverelli & Gianluca Orefice & Nadia Rocha, 2011. "Offshoring and Migration in a World with Policy Spillovers," Research Papers by the Institute of Economics and Econometrics, Geneva School of Economics and Management, University of Geneva 11105, Institut d'Economie et Econométrie, Université de Genève.
  11. Runjuan Liu & Daniel Trefler, 2011. "A Sorted Tale of Globalization: White Collar Jobs and the Rise of Service Offshoring," NBER Working Papers 17559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Antoni, Manfred & Janser, Markus & Lehmer, Florian, 2014. "The hidden winners of renewable energy promotion : insights into sector-specific wage differentials," IAB Discussion Paper 201412, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  13. David Amirault & Paul Fenton & Thérèse Laflèche, 2013. "Asking About Wages: Results from the Bank of Canada’s Wage Setting Survey of Canadian Companies," Discussion Papers 13-1, Bank of Canada.
  14. Semih Akcomak & Suzanne Kok & Hugo Rojas-Romagosa, 2013. "The effects of technology and offshoring on changes in employment and task-content of occupations," CPB Discussion Paper 233, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  15. Basco, Sergi & Mestieri, Martí, 2013. "Heterogeneous trade costs and wage inequality: A model of two globalizations," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 393-406.
  16. Ledia Guci & Charles Ian Mead, 2014. "Domestic Trade in Services in Regional Input-Output Models," BEA Working Papers 0106, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

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