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Does Food Aid Stabilize Food Availability?

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  • Barrett, Christopher B

Abstract

This paper explores the empirical relationship between U.S. food aid flows per capita and nonconcessional food availability per capita in PL 480 recipient economies. The evidence suggests PL 480, while modestly progressive in its distribution, is if anything procyclical in recipient economies. Food aid fails to stabilize food availability. Both increased domestic food production – i.e., agricultural development – and commercial trade appear more effective than food aid in advancing food security objectives through the stabilization of food availability per capita in low-income economies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 49 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 335-49

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:49:y:2001:i:2:p:335-49

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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References

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  1. Christopher B. Barrett, 1998. "Food Aid: Is It Development Assistance, Trade Promotion, Both, or Neither?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 566-571.
  2. Ball, Richard & Johnson, Christopher, 1996. "Political, Economic, and Humanitarian Motivations for PL 480 Food Aid: Evidence from Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(3), pages 515-37, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ruth Vargas Hill, 2005. "Assessing rhetoric and reality in the predictability of aid," Human Development Occasional Papers (1992-2007) HDOCPA-2005-25, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
  2. Little, Peter D., 2008. "Food Aid Dependency in Northeastern Ethiopia: Myth or Reality?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 860-874, May.
  3. Max Blouin & Stéphane Pallage, 2007. "Humanitarian Relief and Civil Conflict," Cahiers de recherche 0706, CIRPEE.
  4. Barrett, Christopher B. & Holden, Stein & Clay, Daniel C., 2002. "Can Food-for-Work Programmes Reduce Vulnerability?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  5. Barrett, C. B. & Heisey, K. C., 2002. "How effectively does multilateral food aid respond to fluctuating needs?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 477-491.
  6. Young, Linda M., 2002. "Options for World Trade Organization Involvement in Food Aid," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 3(1).
  7. Clarke, Daniel J. & Hill, Ruth Vargas, 2013. "Cost-benefit analysis of the african risk capacity facility:," IFPRI discussion papers 1292, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Zant, Wouter, 2012. "The economics of food aid under subsistence farming with an application to Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 124-141.
  9. Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "Food Aid’s Intended and Unintended Consequences," Working Papers 06-05, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  10. MoonJoong Tcha & Fiona Lio, 2002. "An Analysis of Food Aid and Altruism," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 02-19, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  11. Barrett, Christopher B., 2002. "Food Aid And Commercial International Food Trade," Working Papers 14742, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  12. Kuhlgatz, Christian & Abdulai, Awudu & Barrett, Christopher B., 2009. "Food Aid Allocation Policies: Donor Coordination and Responsiveness to the Needs of Recipient Countries," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51686, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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