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Aiding Conflict: The Impact of U.S. Food Aid on Civil War

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  • Nunn, Nathan
  • Qian, Nancy

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of U.S. food aid on conflict in recipient countries. To establish a causal relationship, we exploit time variation in food aid caused by fluctuations in U.S. wheat production together with cross-sectional variation in a country's tendency to receive any food aid from the United States. Our estimates show that an increase in U.S. food aid increases the incidence, onset and duration of civil conflicts in recipient countries. Our results suggest that the effects are larger for smaller scale civil conflicts. No effect is found on interstate warfare.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8799.

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Date of creation: Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8799

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Keywords: Civil Conflict; Foreign Aid; Humanitarian Aid;

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References

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  3. Nathan Nunn & Nancy Qian, 2014. "The Determinants of Food Aid Provisions to Africa and the Developing World," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes: Sustainable Growth National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Aid wars
    by Johan Fourie in Johan Fourie's Blog on 2012-05-27 07:03:12
  2. Aid wars
    by Johan Fourie in Johan Fourie's Blog on 2012-05-27 07:03:12
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Cited by:
  1. Axel Dreher & Anna Minasyan & Peter Nunnenkamp, 2013. "Government Ideology in Donor and Recipient Countries: Does Political Proximity Matter for the Effectiveness of Aid?," Kiel Working Papers 1870, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  2. Dimico, Arcangelo, 2013. "The Evolution of Conflict and Effectiveness of Aid," MPRA Paper 47050, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Maystadt, Jean-François & Trinh Tan, Jean-François & Breisinger, Clemens, 2014. "Does food security matter for transition in Arab countries?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 106-115.
  4. Hull, Peter & Imai, Masami, 2013. "Economic shocks and civil conflict: Evidence from foreign interest rate movements," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 77-89.
  5. Margolies, Amy & Hoddinott, John, 2012. "Mapping the Impacts of Food Aid: Current Knowledge and Future Directions," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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