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Path Dependence Research in Regional Economic Development: Cacophony or Knowledge Accumulation?

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  • Martin Henning
  • Erik Stam
  • Rik Wenting

Abstract

Henning M., Stam E. and Wenting R. Path dependence research in regional economic development: cacophony or knowledge accumulation, Regional Studies . The concept of path dependence has gained momentum in the social sciences, particularly in economic geography. This paper explores the empirical literature on path dependence and path creation in regional economic development. It offers a critical reflection on these studies and outlines commonalities and problems in research designs and empirical testing. The review suggests that the popularity of the path dependence concept in regional studies has led to a cacophony of studies rather than to a purposeful accumulation of knowledge around the concept. Gaps are identified and guidelines are suggested for future research on path creation and path dependence in regional development.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 47 (2013)
Issue (Month): 8 (September)
Pages: 1348-1362

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Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:47:y:2013:i:8:p:1348-1362

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