Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Evolution in Economic Geography: Institutions, Political Economy, and Adaptation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Danny MacKinnon
  • Andrew Cumbers
  • Andy Pike
  • Kean Birch
  • Robert McMaster

Abstract

Economic geography has, over the past decade or so, drawn upon ideas from evolutionary economics in trying to understand processes of regional growth and change. Recently, some researchers have sought to delimit and develop an "evolutionary economic geography" (EEG), aiming to create a more systematic theoretical framework for research. This article provides a sympathetic critique and elaboration of this emergent EEG but takes issue with some aspects of its characterization in recent programmatic statements. While acknowledging that EEG is an evolving and pluralist project, we are concerned that the reliance on certain theoretical frameworks that are imported from evolutionary economics and complexity science threatens to isolate it from other approaches in economic geography, limiting the opportunities for cross-fertilization. In response, the article seeks to develop a social and pluralist conception of institutions and social agency in EEG, drawing upon the writings of leading institutional economists, and to link evolutionary concepts to political economy approaches, arguing that the evolution of the economic landscape must be related to processes of capital accumulation and uneven development. As such, we favor the use of evolutionary and institutional concepts within a geographical political economy approach, rather than the construction of some kind of theoretically separate EEG-evolution in economic geography, not an evolutionary economic geography. Copyright (c) 2009 Clark University.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1944-8287.2009.01017.x
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Clark University in its journal Economic Geography.

Volume (Year): 85 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 129-150

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:ecgeog:v:85:y:2009:i:2:p:129-150

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Worcester, MA 01610-1477
Phone: (508)793-7226
Fax: (508)793-8449
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0013-0095
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=0013-0095

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Ron Boschma, 2014. "Towards an evolutionary perspective on regional resilience," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1409, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Mar 2014.
  2. Ron Boschma & KOen Frenken, 2010. "The emerging empirics of evolutionary economic geography," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 10-10, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS), revised Nov 2010.
  3. Harald Bathelt & Andrew Munro & Ben Spigel, 2011. "Challenges of Transformation: Innovation, Re-bundling and Traditional Manufacturing in Canada's Technology Triangle," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1111, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jun 2011.
  4. Martin Henning & Erik Stam & Rik Wenting, 2012. "Path dependence research in regional economic development: Cacophony or knowledge accumulation?," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1219, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Oct 2012.
  5. Jussi Ahokas, 2011. "A comprehensive view of regional economic development in Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa10p469, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Hansen , Teis & Coenen , Lars, 2013. "The Geography of Sustainability Transitions: A Literature Review," CIRCLE Electronic Working Papers 2013/39, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
  7. Dirk Fornahl & Robert Hassink & Claudia Klaerding & Ivo Mossig & Heike Schröder, 2011. "From the old path of shipbuilding onto the new path of offshore wind energy? The case of northern Germany," ERSA conference papers ersa11p558, European Regional Science Association.
  8. Grillitsch, Markus, 2014. "Institutional Change and Economic Evolution in Regions," CIRCLE Electronic Working Papers 2014/1, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
  9. Asheim, Bjørn & M. Bugge, Markus & Coenen, Lars & Herstad, Sverre, 2013. "What Does Evolutionary Economic Geography Bring To The Policy Table? Reconceptualising regional innovation systems," CIRCLE Electronic Working Papers 2013/5, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
  10. Elvira Uyarra, 2011. "Regional innovation systems revisited: networks, institutions, policy and complexity," Openloc Working Papers 1113, Public policies and local development.
  11. Jun Zhang, 2011. "Related Variety, Global Connectivity and Institutional Embeddedness: Internet Development in Beijing and Shanghai Compared," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1110, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jun 2011.
  12. Martina Fuchs & Hanno Kempermann, 2011. "Regional effects of the crisis in German engine building industries," ERSA conference papers ersa10p137, European Regional Science Association.
  13. Stuart Dawley & Andy Pike & John Tomaney, 2010. "Towards the resilient region?: policy activism and peripheral region development," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33523, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  14. Heike Schroeder, 2011. "Application possibilities of the micro-meso-macro framework in economic geography," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1115, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Aug 2011.
  15. Robert & Claudia Klaerding, 2012. "Theoretical advancement in economic geography by engaged pluralism," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1202, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jan 2012.
  16. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2014. "Towards a Developmental Turn in Evolutionary Economic Geography?," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1401, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jan 2014.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecgeog:v:85:y:2009:i:2:p:129-150. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.