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Employment Location and Associated Commuting Patterns for Individuals in Disadvantaged Rural Areas in Northern Ireland

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  • Joan Moss
  • Claire Jack
  • Michael Wallace
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    Abstract

    Moss J. E., Jack C. G. and Wallace M. T. (2004) Employment location and associated commuting patterns for individuals in disadvantaged rural areas in Northern Ireland, Reg. Studies 38, 121-136. This paper investigates the employment commuting patterns of individuals living in disadvantaged rural areas of Northern Ireland. A survey of rural households is conducted and the data used to map the commuting patterns of individuals in employment. The analysis identifies key explanatory variables relating to observed commuting distances. These variables highlight particular constraints on employment locational choices available to rural households. The results identify a distinct interaction between rural and urban given the concentration of employment in regional and/or larger urban centres. For females, local employment tends to focus on the nearest regional town, with a heavy reliance upon public sector jobs, particularly in the areas of education and health. Male employment is concentrated in declining traditional industries and rural males travel lengthy distances to work. Mobility is undoubtedly a crucial aspect of accessing and retaining employment for working rural dwellers. From a rural development policy perspective, measures designed to enhance the mobility of rural dwellers are therefore a priority.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Regional Studies.

    Volume (Year): 38 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 121-136

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:38:y:2004:i:2:p:121-136

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    Related research

    Keywords: Rural dwellers; Commuting patterns; Local labour markets; Employment location; Ruraux; Migrations quotidiennes; Marches du travail locaux; Localisation de l'emploi; Landbewohner; Pendelmuster; Ortlicher Stellenmarkt; Standort der Erwerbstatigkeit; Habitantes que viven en zonas rurales; Patrones de desplazamiento diario; Mercados laborales locales; Lugar de empleo;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Bryden, John & Bollman, Ray, 2000. "Rural employment in industrialised countries," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 185-197, March.
    2. Sarah Monk & Ian Hodge & Jessica Dunn, 2000. "Supporting Rural Labour Markets," Local Economy, London South Bank University, vol. 15(4), pages 302-311, November.
    3. David L. Barkley & Mark S. Henry & Shuming Bao, 1996. "Identifying "Spread" versus "Backwash" Effects in Regional Economic Areas: A Density Functions Approach," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 72(3), pages 336-357.
    4. Rouwendal, Jan, 1999. "Spatial job search and commuting distances," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 491-517, July.
    5. Timothy R. Wojan, 2000. "The Composition of Rural Employment Growth in the “New Economy”," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 594-605.
    6. Michael T. Wallace & Joan E. Moss, 2002. "Farmer Decision-Making with Conflicting Goals: A Recursive Strategic Programming Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 82-100.
    7. Vera-Toscano, Esperanza & Weersink, Alfons & Phimister, Euan, 2001. "Female Employment Rates and Labour Market Attachment in Rural Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001153e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    8. Jan K. Brueckner & Jacques-FranÁois Thisse & Yves Zenou, 2002. "Local Labor Markets, Job Matching, and Urban Location," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 155-171, February.
    9. Bryden, John & Bollman, Ray, 2000. "Rural employment in industrialised countries," Agricultural Economics: The Journal of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(2), March.
    10. White, Michelle J, 1986. "Sex Differences in Urban Commuting Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 368-72, May.
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