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Foreign direct investment and technology spillovers in sub-Saharan Africa


  • Shunsuke Managi
  • Samuel Mulenga Bwalya


Foreign direct investment (FDI) is an effective conduit for technology transfer through technology spillovers to domestically owned firms in the host country. This study analyses the significance of productivity externalities of FDI to local firms, in terms of both intra-industry and inter-industry spillovers, using firm-level data from Kenya, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. The results show evidences in support of intra- and inter-industry productivity spillovers from FDI for Kenya and Zimbabwe.

Suggested Citation

  • Shunsuke Managi & Samuel Mulenga Bwalya, 2010. "Foreign direct investment and technology spillovers in sub-Saharan Africa," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 605-608.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:6:p:605-608 DOI: 10.1080/13504850802167173

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Bagnoli, Mark, 1993. "Courtship as a Waiting Game," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 185-202, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova, 2011. "How to Stir Up FDI Spillovers: Evidence from a Large Meta-Analysis," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1021, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. repec:bla:jecsur:v:31:y:2017:i:2:p:546-571 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:tefoso:v:128:y:2018:i:c:p:154-163 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Hidemichi Fujii & Jing Cao & Shunsuke Managi, 2015. "Decomposition of Productivity Considering Multi-environmental Pollutants in Chinese Industrial Sector," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 75-84, February.
    5. J. Rosell-Martinez & P. Sanchez-Sellero, 2012. "Foreign direct investment and technical progress in Spanish manufacturing," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(19), pages 2473-2489, July.
    6. Nicola D. Coniglio & Rezart Hoxhaj & Adnan Seric, 2017. "The demand for foreign workers by foreign firms: evidence from Africa," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 153(2), pages 353-384, May.
    7. Iršová, Zuzana & Havránek, Tomáš, 2013. "Determinants of Horizontal Spillovers from FDI: Evidence from a Large Meta-Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1-15.
    8. Amendolagine, Vito & Boly, Amadou & Coniglio, Nicola Daniele & Prota, Francesco & Seric, Adnan, 2013. "FDI and Local Linkages in Developing Countries: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 41-56.
    9. Szirmai A. & Gebreeyesus M. & Guadagno F. & Verspagen B., 2013. "Promoting productive employment in Sub‐Saharan Africa : a review of the literature," MERIT Working Papers 062, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    10. Birte Pfeiffer & Holger Goerg & Lucia Perez-Villar, 2014. "The Heterogeneity of FDI in Sub-Saharan Africa – How Do the Horizontal Productivity Effects of Emerging Investors Differ from Those of Traditional Players?," GIGA Working Paper Series 262, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    11. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova, 2012. "Survey Article: Publication Bias in the Literature on Foreign Direct Investment Spillovers," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 1375-1396, October.

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