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Fertility of Rural China: Effects of Local Family Planning and Health Programs

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  • Schultz, T Paul
  • Zeng, Yi

Abstract

The rationing of births in China after the 1979 announcement of the "one-child family policy" has been held responsible for the rapid decrease in Chinese fertility, whereas other observers have noted that parallel fertility declines occurred with voluntary behavior in other East and Southeast Asian countries. This paper assesses the joint contribution of local family planning and health programs, individual characteristics of women, and the development of their communities, as explanatory variables for Chinese fertility in rural areas of three provinces in 1985. Given the explicit quantitative reproductive goals of the government, an ordered Probit model for cumulative fertility is estimated for women age 15-34 and 35-49.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 8 (1995)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 329-50

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:8:y:1995:i:4:p:329-50

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Cited by:
  1. Nancy Qian, 2008. "Missing Women and the Price of Tea in China: The Effect of Sex-Specific Earnings on Sex Imbalance," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 123(3), pages 1251-1285, August.
  2. Tadesse, Fanaye & Headey, Derek, 2012. "Urbanization and fertility rates in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Tansel, Aysit, 2002. "Determinants of school attainment of boys and girls in Turkey: individual, household and community factors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 455-470, October.
  4. Dennis Tao Yang & Marjorie McElroy, 2000. "Carrots and Sticks: Fertility Effects of China's Population Policies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 389-392, May.
  5. Xiaoyu Wu & Lixing Li, 2012. "Family size and maternal health: evidence from the One-Child policy in China," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 1341-1364, October.
  6. Wang, Fei, 2012. "Family Planning Policy in China: Measurement and Impact on Fertility," MPRA Paper 42226, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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