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Determinants of School Attainment of Boys and Girls in Turkey

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  • Tansel, A.

Abstract

This study investigates the determinants of school attainments of boys and girls in Turkey. Although high levels of enrollements have been achieved at the primary school level for both boys and girls in much of Turkey, substantial regional differences remain. In particular, in the Southeastern region, girls begin to drop out of school around the third grade. Only half of the primary school graduates register at the middle level. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the determinants of educational attainments at the primary, middle and high school levels.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Yale - Economic Growth Center in its series Papers with number 789.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:yalegr:789

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Postal: U.S.A.; YALE UNIVERSITY, ECONOMIC GROWTH CENTER, YALE STATION NEW-HAVEN CONNECTICUT 06520 U.S.A
Phone: (203) 432-3610
Fax: (203) 432-3898
Web page: http://www.econ.yale.edu/~egcenter/
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Keywords: GENDER ; TURKEY ; EDUCATION;

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Cited by:
  1. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2013. "Higher education in Turkey: Subsidizing the rich or the poor?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 75-92.
  2. Nicolas Fleury & Fabrice Gilles, 2013. "An evaluation of the impact of industrial restructuring on individual human capital accumulation in France (1956-1993)," TEPP Working Paper 2013-09, TEPP.
  3. Meltem Dayioglu & Serap Türüt-Asik, 2004. "Gender Differences in Academic Performance in a Large Public University in Turkey," ERC Working Papers 0417, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2004.
  4. Stacy J. Kosko, 2012. "Educational Attainment and School-to-work Conversion of Roma in Romania: Adapting to Feasible Means or Ends?," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 415-450, August.
  5. Pushkar Maitra, 2001. "Schooling and Educational Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," ASARC Working Papers 2001-07, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
  6. Raymond, Melanie & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2001. "The Impact Of Educational Grants On Basic Education Completion: Do The Poor Benefit?," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20585, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  7. T. Paul Schultz, 2006. "Does the Liberalization of Trade Advance Gender Equality in Schooling and Health?," Working Papers 935, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  8. Tansel, Aysit, 2002. "Determinants of school attainment of boys and girls in Turkey: individual, household and community factors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 455-470, October.
  9. Djavad Salehi-Isfahani & Insan Tunali & Ragui Assaad, 2009. "A comparative study of returns to education of urban men in Egypt, Iran, and Turkey," Working Papers e07-17, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
  10. Aysit Tansel, 2001. "Economic Development and Female Labor Force Participation in Turkey: Time-Series Evidence and Cross-Province Estimates," ERC Working Papers 0105, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised May 2001.
  11. Kirdar, Murat G. & Dayioglu, Meltem & Koc, Ismet, 2012. "Does longer compulsory education equalize educational attainment by gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic background?," MPRA Paper 39995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Subha Mani & John Hoddinott & John Strauss, 2009. "Determinants of Schooling Outcomes: Empirical Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2009-03, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
  13. Efraín Rodríguez Lozano, 2011. "¿Barreras Lingüísticas en la Educación?: La Influencia de la Lengua Materna en la Deserción Escolar," Documentos de Trabajo 2011-324, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.

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